Archive for October, 2009

Junction digs in to help beautify our parks

JRA Post - The Junction digs in - Oct 28 2009On October 17th great weather brought out 20 volunteers across 3 parks in the Junction for bulb planting.

The Toronto Parks and Trees Foundation donated 1000 bulbs to the JRA which we planted in Malta, Vine and Maria Park.

Thanks to the JRA team for planning the event and to all the volunteers who came out to help beautify the Junction.

I can’t wait for spring to see the results.



Post by Martin L. JRA urban commnittee

Demolition of the rear of the Handyman Shop begins this morning, and is in full swing.

Using more muscle than machinery – well no machinery the building is coming down quickly.

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Green Together's Eco-Energy Fair

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Green Together’s Eco-Energy Fair
Sun Nov 1, 2009 / 1:00pm – 4:00pm

Sunday, November 1
1:00-4:00 pm
Wychwood Barns
(Christie, two blocks south of St. Clair)


Cold Weather’s coming –don’t let it into your home!

Most older homes have air leaks — if yours is typical, it could be like having a hole in your house the size of an open window.

Now’s the time to stop those leaks and make your house more energy efficient. Green Together’s Eco-Energy Fair will give you everything you need — all in one place on one Sunday afternoon.

-Learn about home energy audits – what they’ll tell you and how to use them to get government rebates. Meet certified auditors and sign up for an appointment on the spot.

-Got a project in mind? Meet with experienced contractors used by your neighbours to discuss your options for insulation, draft-proofing, energy-efficient furnaces, instantaneous hot water, and more.

-Stop by the on-site displays of solar systems. Talk with experts about the options and whether one is right for you.

Link to Green Neighbours 21 site

Solid Waste Division fears your excess recycling

The timestudy monster

The time study monster

It seems a report in the Toronto Star has caused the outing of a  little known rule for collection personal who drive our streets to collect  household recycling.  In an effort to achieve maximum collection efficiency- that is, the amount a team can pick up in a shift, there is a rule that does not allow the flexibility of the driver to pick up any excess recycling.

This action could result in a risk of homeowners choosing not to participate but instead throw their excess recycling or compost into the garbage, a city report states

This information was presented to council in a motion for information request by by Councillor Ootes, seconded by Councillor Stintz

Their motion ends with this paragraph

There should not be a limit placed on the amount of recycling that a homeowner can dispose of at their curbside. There should be a convenient, simple and encouraging program that allows for excess recycling to homeowners when the need does occur.

Full motion jump below.

MM41.11 Costs and Issues Related to Excess Household Recycling –

Information Report Request, by Councillor Ootes, seconded by

Councillor Stintz

* Notice of this Motion has been given.

* This Motion is subject to referral to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee. A two thirds vote is required to waive referral.

Recommendations

Councillor Ootes, seconded by Councillor Stintz, recommends that:

1. City Council direct the General Manager of Solid Waste Management Services to report back to the next meeting of City Council, on the costs that are incurred with picking up the excess bagged recycling.

2. City Council direct the General Manager of Solid Waste Management Services to also include in the report the direct impact on the waste diversion program based on not picking up excess bagged recycling, which could ultimately end up in landfill.

Summary

The City of Toronto has implemented aggressive diversion programs to reduce waste from our landfills including the Green Bin, Blue Bins and user-pay Garbage bin program. The success of these programs relies on the ability of the homeowner to effectively participate in the City’s diversion efforts. If recycling, or any other program, was to become an

inconvenience, there could be a risk of homeowners choosing not to participate but instead throw their excess recycling or compost into the garbage.

On some occasions, households may find that they have an excess amount of recycling. The easiest solution is to place the recycling in a clear or clear-blue plastic bag beside the recycling container to indicate to the Solid Waste driver that it is recycling. However, according to a recent interview in the Toronto Star, the Solid Waste Division has indicated that there is a rule that does not allow the flexibility of the driver to pick up any excess recycling for fear of achieving maximum efficiency.

2

There should not be a limit placed on the amount of recycling that a homeowner can dispose of at their curbside. There should be a convenient, simple and encouraging program that allows for excess recycling to homeowners when the need does occur.

(Submitted to City Council on October 26 and 27, 2009 as MM41.11)

there is a rule

that does not allow the flexibility of the driver to pick up any excess recycli

Local residents plan for their future – traffic reduction efforts

Runnymede Road at Liverpool Street

Local residents living in the Runnymede Road at Liverpool Street area have sought and received a traffic calming measure in the form of signs prohibiting northbound left turns from Runnymede Road to Liverpool Street during the morning and afternoon peak periods.

Walmart and the BMO bank have probably already affected the community with increased traffic of cars and trucks causing drivers to try and short cut around it. This fall a new TD bank will open along with the new Old Mill car dealership further increasing the traffic in the area. This move by the community caps the issue before it gets worse- good early move!

…read on for the text of the cites background file on this issue

ISSUE BACKGROUND

Councillor Frances Nunziata, on behalf of residents of Liverpool Street, requested Transportation Services staff to determine the feasibility of implementing peak period turn prohibitions northbound from Runnymede Road onto Liverpool Street. In addition, residents also requested staff to review the feasibility of implementing an all-way stop control at the intersection of Castleton Avenue and Liverpool Street and to review speeding on Liverpool Street between Castleton Avenue and Runnymede Road (addressed in a separate report). A map of the area is Attachment No. 1.

COMMENTS

Liverpool Street between Castleton Avenue and Runnymede Road is an 8.45 metre wide two-way local residential road with a posted speed limit of 50 km/h. There are sidewalks on both sides of Liverpool Street, however, they are not continuous as sections of sidewalk are missing on the north side of Liverpool Street, just east of Castleton Avenue and on the south side of Liverpool Street, just west of Runnymede Road. Parking is prohibited at all times on the north side of the road but is allowed on the south side of the road up to the city wide unposted three hour limit. Two parking lots which accommodate overnight permit parking, 9:00 p.m. to 9:00 a.m. daily, exist at either end of the street.

The surrounding area is comprised of mainly single family homes. Castleton Avenue, between St. Clair Avenue West and Henrietta Street, is an 8.7 metre wide two-way collector road, with a posted speed limit of 40 km/h. Liverpool Street intersects with Castleton Avenue to form a “T” type intersection to the north of St. Clair Avenue West and west of Runnymede Road. This intersection is currently controlled by a stop sign for westbound traffic on Liverpool Street. The TTC operates bus service via Runnymede Road/Henrietta Street/Castleton Avenue.

Runnymede Road is a collector road north of St. Clair Avenue that is 14.7 metres wide south of Liverpool Street and 8.6 metres wide north of Liverpool Street. During the morning and afternoon peak periods, some northbound Runnymede Road motorists wishing to access Castleton Avenue use Liverpool Street as a short cut to avoid the intersection of Henrietta Street and Runnymede Road.

In order to mitigate these concerns, Transportation Services staff examined the possibility of week-day turn prohibitions from Runnymede Road to Liverpool Street, during the morning and afternoon peak hours, Monday to Friday. Specifically, these turn prohibitions would prohibit northbound left turns from Runnymede Road to Liverpool Street between 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. and between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m., Monday to Friday.

These proposed turn prohibitions would require motorists to use Runnymede Road and Henrietta Street or St. Clair Avenue West and Castleton Avenue, to gain vehicular access to the area, rather than the local road network. Approval of these turn prohibitions would provide for a safer overall environment for all road users by keeping traffic on the collector roads (Runnymede Road, Henrietta Street and Castleton Avenue).

prohibit northbound left turns from Runnymede Road to Liverpool Street during the morning

and afternoon peak period

Dave LeBlanc of the Globe and Mail tours the Junction

A couple of excerpts from the newspaper article

Okay, here’s one more: If you haven’t heard of architect James Augustus Ellis (1856 – 1935), it’s high time you took a tour of the neighbourhood, as I did one bright and chilly mid-October day with the book’s author, Barbara Myrvold. The occasion, if the book’s re-release and a love of good architecture wasn’t enough, was the 100th anniversary of the opening of the library, designed by Mr. Ellis and partner William Connery and built with funds obtained via a Carnegie grant.

We met in the library’s foyer, upon which Ms. Myrvold took me to the basement level to collect local history expert David Wencer in the offices of the West Toronto Junction Historical Society (a tenant since 1997), and then up to the main reception area to see the gorgeous ceiling, uncovered by architects Henno Sillaste and Hiro Nakashima during a 1979 renovation.

But that’s the charm of the Junction: Houses, commercial and institutional buildings by a world-class architect rub elbows with those of lesser stock. Once a gritty railroad town, it was annexed by the City of Toronto in 1909 and remained under the real estate radar for nine decades as a place with “a fierce, independent spirit,” says Mr. Wencer. Since the late 1990s, however, the secret’s been out as artists looking for cheap studio space and bargain-hunting hipster couples discover its rough charm.

full article link

Parking meter removed today in relation to new High Park traffic lights

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Park link employees remove the  Parking meter today in front of the chocolate shop. Speaking to a few business  owners near the intersection, it is clear they like the lights.

The only change some would like is the placement back in use of a couple of the parking spots on the north side  to slow traffic – some of which uses the most north lane as a passing lane when exiting the lights.

Junction Post Office saved

The Junction Post office has been saved with a new 5 year agreement with Canada Post.

A concerted effort of residents signing petitions and the efforts of the local federal MP Gerard Kennedy and his local office all spearheaded by the Junction BIA under  their executive director Anna-Louise Richardson who also working long hours to achieve the goal.

more details to follow

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The Junction's happy postmaster after hearing the news

Two Junction events this weekend

West Toronto Junction Historical Society
WILD, WILD, JUNCTION
HISTORICAL MYSTERY TOUR
It was a night of Legend, the night they closed the bars in the Junction.  The newspapers claimed ten thousand men in the streets.  The women weren’t even counted although they’d made their voice heard.  West Toronto Junction was about to embark on a dry sea of temperance: the Local Option.  But how wild could a town get to have to close down its own bars?  Join us to find out for our fall fund raiser!
2PM, Sunday, Oct. 25, beginning at the Troubadour, 3071 Dundas West (south side just east of Quebec) and ending at Shox (2827Dundas St. W. just east of Keele.)
For father information, contact, Neil Ross
See Poster at Junction Parents Blog here

and the
Junction BIA
*The Junction Pumpkin Fest & Scary Halloween Movies Event*
The Junction BIA, and the Rue Morgue House of Horror invite you and your family to The Junction Pumpkin fest & Scary movies event held at The Junction Train station (Dundas/Pacific) on Saturday, Oct 24.
Come join the fun! We will have pumpkin drawing and pumpkin carving for everyone.
Kids 1 to 4 years old can decorate pumpkins (with parental assistance), while kids 5 to 12-years-old can carve their own pumpkins. All the necessary materials are provided free of charge. And the pre-Halloween festivities don’t end there! The evening will see a selection of family-friendly classic spooky movies (not too scary) projected at the Junction Train Station. Seating, hot chocolate and treats will be provided – and it’s all free of charge. Dress warmly!
see poster at the Junction Parents blog here


Junction area receives no support from the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program

Looking at the list of funded projects for the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program it seems that the Junction will see no benefit from the program although other areas nearby  will.

Maybe what is needed is joint effort of residents in the Junction  to begin to develop plans to seek available funds, by  working with elected members in advance of such offers at the federal and provincial level spelling, out priority needs so when funds are offered the groups can  lobby the members about  known projects.

Before are some example listed in the approved projects.

22-10-2009 11-46-28 AM Recreational Infrastructure  Canada Program  in Ontario site link