Auto body who to be converted to lofts

One of the buildings that housed one of the oldest auto body shops in the Junction is to the plot for new condos.


wLink to sales site

More to follow in a later post
Location:Dundas St W,Toronto,Canada

7 Comments

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  1. Sonny P says:

    Curious about the last picture? What's it all about??

  2. Helen says:

    Has anyone had a look on the website. The ammenities listed are all on Bloor…not a single business on Dundas was mentioned.

  3. junctioneer says:

    It is an image of the rear of the building. I find it so interesting the close proximity that Junction buildings have been build with.

    I though no one would be interested so I did not comment on the picture.

    Thanks for asking

  4. Raymond says:

    High Park Urban Lofts! What a joke! The Junction is NOT High Park, nor High Park North or even "near High Park". Just more real estate BS hyping the location for sales.

  5. Smodes says:

    The Street it is on is high park. Make more sense now?

  6. Raymond says:

    Yes, I know it is on High Park Avenue. Looking at their website I see they do refer to the Junction.

  7. A.R. says:

    They mention the " 'Junction' urban renewal process" (with Junction strangely in quotation marks as though it were merely an abstract idea, not an actual place) but simply ignore the iconic Dundas Street West area in their strange map, which is oriented towards the east. Perhaps that's for the better because in looking closer at the website's copy, the use of the word "renewal" as opposed to "revitalization" is problematic because "urban renewal" is more associated with the 1960s process of razing old buildings, no matter their heritage value, for new buildings. Back then, "urban renewal" seemed to amount to a euphemism for crudely modernizing a city by wiping out anything old, no matter how historic, interesting, and beautiful. That's the sort of process that's definitely unwelcome and undesirable in The Junction, in Toronto, or anywhere in Canada really.

    The architecture is decent. Yet the front facade is forgettable, and the orange stucco doesn't have much to do with the architectural history of the area. As shown in the renderings, it isn't used in a particularly striking or novel way. In the back, it looks cheap and alien with mostly orange stucco used as cladding. Though it's the backside, in a dense neighbourhood like The Junction, a lot of people will probably see it besides just the residents of the building.

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