Archive for April, 2019

Safe rail fundraiser June 1st Vine Parkette.

mayor said he is open to more citizens participating in city government

The mayor said he is open to more citizens participating in city government, potentially filling spots on city boards, agencies and corporations.
“Having accomplished citizens come and be part of those discussions on boards and for that matter at the community level would not only be good for governance in terms of producing better results but would help alleviate some of the load on councillors who are now overseeing much bigger wards,” Tory said.
He also wants the city to strengthen its 311 and online services so councillors can spend less time tackling constituent problems and more time developing public policy.
“I am hopeful this will help us speed up … substantially altering the way citizens interact with their government,” Tory said.

Will the city create three or four community council advisory boards?

A discussion paper released Wednesday urges the city to create three or four community council advisory boards across the city each composed of about 20 appointed citizens who would make recommendations to community councils and refer contentious planning applications to a new city mediation office.
Currently, Toronto is divided into four areas each represented by a community council — Etobicoke York, North York, Scarborough, and Toronto and East York. Councillors sit on the community council that their ward is in, hold public hearings and make decisions and recommendations on local planning matters. Most decisions made at community council end up going to city council for final approval.
Community council advisory boards would reduce councillors’ workloads by filtering through the number of deputations that go before community councils, said one of the paper’s authors, planner Beate Bowron, who wrote it alongside community activist Sue Dexter and political scientist Gary Davidson. They urged the city to form a task force to consult with the public on how these citizen-driven groups should be structured. 
“These are suggestions to feed into public discourse. We are not pretending we have all the answers,” said Bowron. 
The authors were motivated to write the paper because “we thought there was potentially a huge democractic deficit (with 25 councillors). The fear is the access of the community to councillors will be severely diminished,” said Bowron.
The paper also suggests consolidating city council’s 14 committees into three groups with seven to nine councillors on each, and replacing some of the 91 councillor appointments on the city’s 37 agencies, boards and commissions with citizens.
“We are not by any means saying those big important boards (like Toronto Transit Commission) should have no councillors on them, but might need to have fewer,” Bowron said. Some of the nine councillors on the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, for example, could be filled with citizens. 
Tory must push for these kinds of changes if he wants to have an effective second term, said Gabriel Eidelman, a University of Toronto urban policy professor, who was part of a team that made recommendations in 2017 on how city council could improve decision-making.

Micro firms out position bigger firms according to am

 

 

A long tail of 20,000 companies below the top 100 produced half of all growth. Ads would be hopelessly ex-pensive so driving demand would be im-possible. No large retailer would stock it. The growth of «just-in-time» manufacturing means start-ups no longer need to splurge on inventory.

Other service providers can pass on economies of scale once available only to consumer-goods giants. Lumi, a packaging firm, uses a network of factories to design and produce packaging for small brands. It represents thousands of brands so can get better prices. Businesses such as ShipBob, a Chicago startup, do something similar with ship-ping, allowing small brands to offer faster, cheaper deliveries.

The costs are high but it gives them access to the online giant’s shipping services and huge user base. Many of the big firms have, by con-trast, been reluctant to sell on the giant’s website, so feature low in search rankings. More of them have started selling on Ama-zon in recent years, says R.J. Hottovy of Morningstar, a research firm, but it still represents a small slice of their sales. He sold $50,000 of snacks and then, on the basis of data gleaned, Blake’s Seed Based changed its recipe and relaunched in September.

m Gemi, an on-line seller of posh shoes, offers new de-signs weekly so can respond precisely to consumer demands. Their giant rivals, by contrast, use data filtered by retailers. Consumer-goods behemoths are well aware of the threat posed by microbrand ankle-biters. One response is to buy them.

Nestlé’s acquisition in 2017 of Blue Bottle, a hip Californian coffee brand, bought it ex-posure to new market segments. Competition is fierce to buy the best mi-crobrands so big firms may overpay for their acquisition, says Mr Hottovy. Other big firms are trying to grow their own brands. Earlier this year Kraft Heinz launched Spring-board, an incubator for small, disruptive food and drink brands.

In the long term some small brands will be swallowed up but others will be encour-aged, argues Sonali De Rycker of Accel, a venture-capital firm. More will want to re-main independent for longer, or entirely, which will mean larger deals or ipos.

A long tail of 20,000 companies below the top 100 produced half of all growth. Ads would be hopelessly ex-pensive so driving demand would be im-possible.No large retailer would stock it. The growth of «just-in-time» manufacturing means start-ups no longer need to splurge on inventory.

Other service providers can pass on economies of scale once available only to consumer-goods giants.Lumi, a packaging firm, uses a network of factories to design and produce packaging for small brands. It represents thousands of brands so can get better prices. Businesses such as ShipBob, a Chicago startup,do something similar with ship-ping, allowing small brands to offer faster, cheaper deliveries.

The costs are high but it gives them access to the online giant’s shipping services and huge user base.Many of the big firms have, by con-trast, been reluctant to sell on the giant’s website, so feature low in search rankings. More of them have started selling on Ama-zon in recent years, says R.J. Hottovy of Morningstar, a research firm, but it still represents a small slice of their sales. He sold $50,000 of snacks and then, on the basis of data gleaned, Blake’s Seed Based changed its recipe and relaunched in September.

m Gemi, an on-line seller of posh shoes, offers new de-signs weekly so can respond precisely to consumer demands. Their giant rivals, by contrast, use data filtered by retailers. Consumer-goods behemoths are well aware of the threat posed by microbrand ankle-biters. One response is to buy them.

Nestlé’s acquisition in 2017 of Blue Bottle, a hip Californian coffee brand, bought it ex-posure to new market segments. Competition is fierce to buy the best mi-crobrands so big firms may overpay for their acquisition, says Mr Hottovy. Other big firms are trying to grow their own brands. Earlier this year Kraft Heinz launched Spring-board, an incubator for small,disruptive food and drink brands.

In the long term some small brands will be swallowed up but others will be encour-aged, argues Sonali De Rycker of Accel, a venture-capital firm. More will want to re-main independent for longer, or entirely, which will mean larger deals or ipos.

The theatre space on Queen West by Duffern.

 

 

 

 

Recalibrating City Council's Governance System for 26 Members

Recalibrating City Council’s Governance System for 26 MembersCommunications CC1.1.1 to CC1.1.23 have been submitted on this Item.Public Notice GivenOrigin(November 26, 2018) Report from the City Manager and the City Clerk Recommendations
The City Manager and the City Clerk recommend that:

 Special Committee on Governance

 1. City Council establish a Special Committee on Governance with the following terms of reference:

 a. The Special Committee will consider the impacts on the City’s governance structure and processes arising from the reduction in the size of Council and make recommendations to City Council on any further changes to its governance structure.

 b. The Special Committee will establish a work plan and engagement process for the governance review.

 c. The Special Committee is composed of the Mayor or Council Member-designate appointed by the Mayor as Chair and four Council Members appointed by City Council on the recommendation of the Striking Committee.

 d. The Special Committee reports directly to City Council.

 e. Meetings of the Special Committee will be held at the call of the Chair.

 f. The Special Committee will conduct its proceedings in accordance with Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures. The Committee’s meetings will be open to the public and will comply with the Open Meeting Requirements of the City of Toronto Act, 2006.

 g. The City Manager and the City Clerk will provide policy, research and engagement support to the Special Committee.

 h. The City Clerk will provide meeting management support to the Special Committee.

 i. The Special Committee’s mandate will end when it makes its final recommendations to City Council.

 Interim committee structure

 2. City Council adopt the following interim committee structure and mandates and amend Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures, accordingly:

 a. Four Standing Committees composed of six members and the Mayor by right-of-office:

 1. Community and Economic Development Committee – The Community and Economic Development Committee’s primary focus is on social cohesion and the economy, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on strengthening communities, neighbourhoods and the economy.

 2. General Government and Licensing Committee – The General Government and Licensing Committee’s primary focus is on City government assets and resources and business licensing, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on the administrative operations of the City and the licensing of businesses.

 3. Infrastructure and Environment Committee – The Infrastructure and Environment Committee’s primary focus is on infrastructure and the natural environment, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on Toronto’s infrastructure needs and services, parks and forestry and the sustainable use of Toronto’s environment.

 4. Planning and Housing Committee – The Planning and Housing Committee’s primary focus is on urban form and housing development, with a mandate to monitor and make recommendations on planning, property standards, growth and housing development.

 b. Executive Committee is composed of eight members as follows: 

 1. the Mayor
2. the Deputy Mayor 
3. the four Standing Committee Chairs
4. the Budget Committee Chair to be appointed by the Mayor
5. one Member at-large who is a Member of Council appointed by Council

 If the Mayor appoints the First Deputy Mayor as a Standing Committee Chair, City Council will appoint another Member of Council as an at-large member.

 c. Executive Committee’s mandate is amended by removing human resources policy (as this is now part of the General Government and Licensing Committee’s mandate) and by adding the following:

 1. Providing strategic policy direction and receiving routine updates on collective bargaining relating to the City.

 2. Providing strategic direction to staff in negotiating City collective agreements and considering updates on the progress of collective bargaining.

 3. The Executive Committee or any sub-committee struck for these purposes is not an alternative to established employee and union dispute-resolution mechanisms.

 d. Employee and Labour Relations Committee is deleted from the list of special committees.

 e. Striking Committee is reduced from seven Council Members to five Council Members including the Mayor as Chair, or the Deputy Mayor as Chair if so assigned by the Mayor and the restriction that prohibits Striking Committee members from being appointed to more than one of the Civic Theatres Toronto Board or the Toronto Police Services Board is deleted.
f. Civic Appointments Committee is reduced from nine Council Members to five Council Members including the Mayor or Mayor’s designate as Chair appointed by the Mayor.

 g. Budget Committee is reduced from six Council Members to five Council Members and the restriction that prohibits Budget Committee members from being members of the Audit Committee is deleted.

 h. Audit Committee is reduced from six Council Members to five Council Members and the restrictions that prohibit Audit Committee members from being a Committee Chair or a member of the Budget Committee are deleted.

 3. City Council amend Section 27-126C of the Council Procedures, headed “Delegated Duties of Standing Committees”, to reflect that under the interim committee structure, the Planning and Housing Committee and the General Government and Licensing Committee will exercise the authority previously delegated to the Planning and Growth Management Committee and the Government Management Committee in this Section, as applicable.

 Community Council boundaries

 4. City Council amend the now redundant provisions of Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures by adopting the following new community council boundaries:

 a. Etobicoke York Community Council:

 – Ward 1 – Etobicoke North
– Ward 2 – Etobicoke Centre
– Ward 3 – Etobicoke-Lakeshore
– Ward 5 – York South-Weston
– Ward 7 – Humber River-Black Creek

 b. North York Community Council:

 – Ward 6 – York Centre
– Ward 8 – Eglinton-Lawrence
– Ward 15 – Don Valley West
– Ward 16 – Don Valley East
– Ward 17 – Don Valley North
– Ward 18 – Willowdale

 c. Scarborough Community Council:

 – Ward 20 – Scarborough Southwest
– Ward 21 – Scarborough Centre
– Ward 22 – Scarborough-Agincourt
– Ward 23 – Scarborough North
– Ward 24 – Scarborough-Guildwood
– Ward 25 – Scarborough-Rouge Park

 d. Toronto and East York Community Council:

 – Ward 4 – Parkdale-High Park
– Ward 9 – Davenport
– Ward 10 – Spadina-Fort York
– Ward 11 – University-Rosedale
– Ward 12 – Toronto-St. Paul’s
– Ward 13 – Toronto Centre
– Ward 14 – Toronto-Danforth
– Ward 19 – Beaches-East York

 Council member appointments

 5. City Council reduce the appointments of Council Members to the boards, committees and external bodies outlined below and City Council amend the relevant City By-laws including chapters of the Toronto Municipal Code, Relationship Frameworks and Shareholder Directions accordingly:

 a. Artscape Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;

 b. Canadian National Exhibition Association, Municipal Section – reduce appointments by 11 Council Members and City Council request the City Manager and the City Clerk to review the composition of the Municipal Section;

 c. Civic Theatres Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members by deleting the two ward-specific appointments and also delete the requirement that one Member be a member of a specific committee;

 d. CreateTO Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member and City Council also delete the requirement that Members be from different Community Councils;

 e. Debenture Committee – remove the Deputy Mayor;

 f. Heritage Toronto Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;

 g. Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee – reduce by two Council Members;

 h. Toronto Atmospheric Fund Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members;

 i. Toronto Community Housing Corporation Board of Directors – reduce by one Council Member;

 j. Toronto Preservation Board – reduce by two Council Members;

 k. Toronto Public Library Board – reduce by two Council Members;

 l. Toronto Transit Commission Board of Directors – reduce by two Council Members; and

 m. Toronto Zoo Board of Management – reduce by one Council Member.

 6. City Council convert Council Member appointments to public or staff appointments as outlined below:

 a. Design Exchange Board of Directors – convert the two Council Member appointments to two public members;

 b. FoodShare Board of Directors – convert the Council Member appointment to a staff appointment and authorize the City Manager to appoint a staff member representative to the Board;

 c. George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art Board of Trustees – convert the one Council Member appointment to a public member;

 d. Golden Horseshoe Food and Farming Alliance – convert the one Council Member appointment plus alternate to a staff appointment and authorize the City Manager to appoint a staff member representative and alternate to the Alliance;

 e. Harbourfront Centre Board of Directors – convert the three Council Member appointments to one Council Member and two public members;

 f. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Board – convert four Council Member appointments to public members so that Council will appoint five Council Members and nine public members;

 g. Toronto Arts Council – convert the five Council Member appointments to two Council Members and three public members;

 h. Toronto Financial Services Alliance – convert the appointment of the Mayor or designate and the Chair of the Economic Development Committee to two public members; and

 i. York Employees’ Pension and Benefit Fund Committee, and for consistency with the other Pension Plan Boards, City Council appoint the City Manager or designate and the Chief Financial Officer or designate as voting members by-right-of-position (two positions).

 7. City Council discontinue the appointment of Members of Council to the following City bodies and in lieu of board membership direct that the Councillor for the ward where the facility or organization is located be entitled to notice, agendas and minutes for all meetings and be entitled to attend all meetings of the Board, including closed sessions and City Council amend the relevant chapters of the Toronto Municipal Code accordingly:

 a. 70 Berkeley Street Community Centre (University Alumnae Dramatic Club) (one position);

 b. 192 Carlton Street (Second Mile Club) (one position);

 c. Balmy Beach Park Board of Management (one position);

 d. Community Preservation Panels (nine positions);

 e. Haven Toronto Board of Directors (one position); and

 f. University Settlement Community Centre Committee (one position).

 8. City Council discontinue the appointment of Members of Council to the following City bodies and external bodies:

 a. 12 Alexander Street Theatre Project Board of Directors (one position);

 b. Canadian Film Centre Board of Directors (one position);

 c. Canadian Stage Company Board of Directors (two positions);

 d. Crescent Town Recreation Club Inc. Board of Directors (one position);

 e. Dora Mavor Moore Awards Board of Directors (one position);

 f. East York Foundation Nominating Committee (one position);

 g. Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance (one position);

 h. Guild Renaissance Group Board of Directors (one position);

 i. Homes First Society (one position);

 j. L’Association francaise des municipalites de l’Ontario/Association of Francophone Municipalities of Ontario (one position);

 k. Occupational Health and Safety Coordinating Committee (one position);

 l. Ontario Good Roads Association Board of Directors effective February 26, 2020 when the current Council Member appointee’s term ends (one position);

 m. Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Board of Governors (one position);

 n. Ryerson Centre Board of Directors (one position);

 o. Salvation Army Toronto Grace Health Centre Board of Trustees (one position);

 p. Scarborough Arts Council (one position);

 q. Thistletown Multi-Service Centre Board of Management (one position);

 r. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority Regional Watershed Alliance – optional Municipal Representative (one position);

 s. Toronto Business Development Centre Board of Directors (one position);

 t. Toronto Foundation for Student Success (one position);

 u. Toronto Symphony Board of Directors (one position);

 v. Town of York Historical Society (one position);

 w. UrbanArts Community Arts Council (two positions);

 x. York Community Information (one position);

 y. Young Ambassadors Selection Committee for Learnx Foundation (one position); and

 z. Young People’s Theatre Board of Directors (two positions).

 9. City Council amend the composition of the Arena and Community Centre Boards of Management in Chapter 25 of the former Toronto Municipal Code, and former Leaside By-law 1374, as amended to provide that:

 a. the Councillor for the Ward in which an Arena or Community Centre is located shall be a member of the board by-right-of-office;

 b. Ward Councillor positions shall be excluded from the calculation to determine quorum of the board, consistent with the relationship frameworks for arenas and community centres; and

 c. despite Part 9.b above, a ward councillor attending a meeting of a board may be counted in order to achieve quorum,

 and City Council authorize the City Solicitor to submit a Bill to Council to re-enact Chapter 25 of the former Toronto Municipal Code and the applicable provisions in former Leaside By-law 1374, as a new chapter of the current Municipal Code.

 10. City Council amend the composition of its Business Improvement Area Boards of Management to provide that Councillors for the ward(s) in which a Business Improvement Area is located shall be members of the board by-right-of-office and that Chapter 19 of the Toronto Municipal Code be amended accordingly.

 Public member appointments

 11. City Council adopt the following new process for the screening, interviewing and recommending of public appointees to agencies, corporations and tribunals, and the Public Appointments Policy be amended accordingly:

 a. the Civic Appointments Committee will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following agency boards:

 1. Board of Health;
2. Exhibition Place Board of Governors;
3. Ports Toronto;
4. Toronto Investment Board;
5. Toronto Parking Authority;
6. Toronto Police Services Board;
7. Toronto Public Library;
8. Toronto and Region Conservation Authority;
9. Toronto Transit Commission; and
10. Toronto Zoo;

 b. the Mayor’s Corporations Nominating Panel will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following boards:

 1. CreateTO;
2. Metropolitan Toronto Convention Centre;
3. Toronto Community Housing Corporation;
4. Toronto Hydro; and
5. Waterfront Toronto;

 c. City Council establish a Tribunals Nominating Panel with the following Terms of Reference:

 1. The Tribunals Nominating Panel is a roster composed of up to nine public members; members from the roster will convene in panels as determined by the City Clerk;

 2. The Tribunals Nominating Panel will screen, interview and recommend to City Council public appointments to the following Quasi-Judicial Bodies and Tribunals:

 a. Administrative Penalty Tribunal;
b. Committee of Adjustment;
c. Compliance Audit Committee;
d. Dangerous Dog Tribunal;
e. Property Standards Committee;
f. Rooming House Commissioner;
g. Sign Variance Committee;
h. Toronto Licensing Tribunal; and
i. Toronto Local Appeal Body;

 3. The City Clerk will recruit the Tribunals Nominating Panel members in accordance with the provisions of the Public Appointments Policy and will recommend the appointment of members to City Council; City Council appoints the Chair;

 4. The Tribunals Nominating Panel will conduct proceedings in accordance with Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 27, Council Procedures; Panel meetings will begin and end in public and will comply with the Open Meeting Requirements of the City of Toronto Act, 2006;

 5. The City Clerk provides policy support to the Tribunals Nominating Panel;

 6. The City Clerk provides meeting management support to the Tribunals Nominating Panel; and

 7. The Tribunals Nominating Panel submit recommendations to City Council through the City Clerk.

 d. City Council authorize the City Clerk to screen, interview and recommend the balance of the public appointments to City Council through the Civic Appointments Committee, or to Community Council where public appointments have been delegated.

 12. City Council approve a per diem for Tribunals Nominating Panel Members of $250 per half-day to a maximum of $5,000 per calendar year pro-rated on an annual basis from the time of appointment and direct the Chief Financial Officer to include a budget of $45,000 for this purpose in the 2019 budget.

 Transition provisions

 13. City Council direct that as a transition provision, bills previously authorized by a Community Council decision made under delegated authority shall be submitted to and enacted by the Community Council having geographic jurisdiction for the matter effective December 1, 2018.

 14. City Council amend Toronto Municipal Code Chapter 169, City Officials to authorize the City Solicitor, in consultation with the City Clerk, to submit bills to City Council to update the Municipal Code to reflect organizational or governance changes, to refresh chapters for readability, accessible and clear language and to reflect current code style.

 15. City Council authorize the City Manager to execute and deliver to their respective chief executive officers amendments to the Shareholder Directions of the various corporations that reflect City Council’s decision, in a form satisfactory to the City Solicitor.
Summary
The Province of Ontario’s Better Local Government Act, 2018, reduced the number of Toronto’s municipal wards and Councillors to 25 from 47 previously approved by City Council for the 2018 to 2022 term and 44 in the previous term. This will place increased demands on Council Members’ time to carry out both their legislative and constituency duties. City Councillors now serve wards of significantly larger geographic size and up to double the number of constituents.

 City Council’s governance structure is currently calibrated for 45 Members (the Mayor and 44 Councillors) and would be challenged to remain effective and sustainable with 26 Members.

 Without changes to the governance structure, Council Members would: 

  • Hold 97 seats on 14 Council committees (Standing Committees, Executive Committee and special committees);
  • Hold 388 seats on 170 City and external boards;
  • Interview more than 900 public members for 450 appointees to City boards and committees;
  • Experience difficulty attending all required meetings, potentially causing quorum issues and impairing the ability of committees and boards to function effectively; and
  • Establish an Executive Committee of 13 members representing half of the new City Council and potentially impacting the role of City Council as the final decision-making body.

Also, the new ward boundaries make the existing boundaries of Community Councils redundant. No meetings of Community Councils can be held, including statutory hearings under the Planning Act, until City Council adopts new boundaries.

 To address these challenges, the City Manager and the City Clerk recommend City Council: 

  • Adopt an interim committee structure closely modelled on the existing structure but recalibrated for 26 Council Members;
  • Establish a Special Committee on Governance composed of five Council Members to review City Council’s governance structure, including how the interim structure is functioning, and make any necessary recommendations to City Council;
  • Adopt new Community Council boundaries reflecting City Council’s June 2018 decision;
  • Reduce the number of Council Member appointments to City boards and committees and external bodies to better manage demands on Council Members’ time for meetings; and
  • Amend the public appointments process to boards, committees and tribunals to reduce demands on Council Members’ time for interview panels and to ensure public member vacancies and expired terms can be filled in a timely fashion.

Background Information(November 26, 2018) Report from the City Manager and the City Clerk on Recalibrating City Council’s Governance System for 26 Members (CC1.1) 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122083.pdf)
Attachment 1 – Summary of Proposed Council Member Appointments based on Recommended Approach 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122084.pdf)
Attachment 2 – Mixed Approach to Screen and Interview Public Appointment Candidates 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122085.pdf)
Attachment 3 – Summary of Market Rents by Ward 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122086.pdf)
(November 28, 2018) Public Notice on Changes to the Governance Structure and Community Council Boundaries – Amendments to Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 27, Council Procedures 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/bgrd/backgroundfile-122103.pdf)
Communications(November 23, 2018) E-mail from Teresa Hannigan (CC.Main.CC1.1.1) 
(November 15, 2018) E-mail from Ric Amis, Secretary, Parkdale Residents Association (CC.Main.CC1.1.2) 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/comm/communicationfile-87961.pdf
(November 23, 2018) E-mail from Judy Love (CC.Main.CC1.1.3) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from John Klassen (CC.Main.CC1.1.4) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Arthur H. Watson (CC.Main.CC1.1.5) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Marco Bertucci (CC.Main.CC1.1.6) 
(November 20, 2018) Letter from David Harrison, Chair and Henry Wiercinski, Annex Residents’ Association and Gail Misra, Chair and Sue Dexter, Harbord Village Residents’ Association on behalf of 55 Residents’ Associations (CC.Main.CC1.1.7) 
(www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2019/cc/comm/communicationfile-87966.pdf
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Chris Townsend (CC.Main.CC1.1.8) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Zoe Donoahue (CC.Main.CC1.1.9) 
(November 24, 2018) E-mail from Philip Webb (CC.Main.CC1.1.10) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Therese Beaupre (CC.Main.CC1.1.11) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Susan Weatherseed (CC.Main.CC1.1.12) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Ken Girotti (CC.Main.CC1.1.13) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Jeff D. Derksen (CC.Main.CC1.1.14) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Robin Budd (CC.Main.CC1.1.15) 
(November 25, 2018) E-mail from Susan Berry (CC.Main.CC1.1.16) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Pam Hyde (CC.Main.CC1.1.17) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Mary Louise Squissato (CC.Main.CC1.1.18) 
(November 26, 2018) E-mail from Jun Nogami (CC.Main.CC1.1.19) 
(November 27, 2018) E-mail from Mark Field (CC.Main.CC1.1.20) 
(November 27, 2018) E-mail from Sara Cowan (CC.Main.CC1.1.21) 
(October 25, 2018) E-mail from Don Pratt (CC.Main.CC1.1.22) 
(November 28, 2018) E-mail from Tina Leslie (CC.Supp.CC1.1.23

Report offers path forward for 25-member Toronto city counci

Report offers path forward for 25-member Toronto city council

JEFF GRAYTORONTO CITY HALL REPORTERPUBLISHED 18 HOURS AGOUPDATED NOVEMBER 28, 2018  COMMENTS
City Hall in Toronto on Feb. 6, 2018.
FRED LUM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL
Toronto’s smaller city council must streamline its committee structure and cut the number of politicians assigned to oversee everything from its transit agency to its zoo, according to a staff report.
The new council – slashed to 25 members from 44 in the middle of the election campaign by Ontario Premier Doug Ford – meets next week for the first time since the Oct. 22 vote. At the meeting, councillors are set to debate a long list of recommendations on how council should work drawn up by city manager Chris Murray and city clerk Ulli Watkiss and released on Wednesday.
Previously, Toronto city councillors filled hundreds of seats on boards, commissions and agencies across the city – overseeing everything from hockey arenas to community theatres. They also sat on various committees at City Hall that do everything from scour the city’s $11-billion operating budget to approve new parking spots.
The report calls for a series of temporary reforms, including consolidating council’s seven standing committees into just four, while setting up a new special committee of council to study permanent changes to the way council operates.
However, some councillors feared the proposals would hand too much power to Mayor John Tory.
Councillor Gord Perks, who represents Ward 4 (Parkdale-High Park) and is a left-leaning critic of the mayor, points out the report calls for cutting the number of council-appointed who sit on a long list of bodies, including the boards of Toronto Community Housing Corp. and the Toronto Public Library, but the proposal also maintains the mayor’s ability to appoint a member to such boards as his designate.
That, Mr. Perks says, effectively strengthens the mayor at the expense of council: “If you apply what I always call the Rob Ford test, which is when you had a mayor who couldn’t function and council had to take over his role, do you want to give new powers to that guy?”
He criticized Premier Ford for imposing the 25-member structure on the city, which Mr. Perks argues will only make Toronto politicians more removed from their constituents as they deal with citizen complaints and contentious high-rise development applications in wards that are now twice as large, with an average population of 110,000.
Councillor Paula Fletcher (Ward 14, Toronto-Danforth), who like Mr. Perks is to the left of Mr.Tory, said she is concerned the smaller council and new structure will make it harder to oversee the city’s various agencies, some of which spend hundreds of millions of dollars, as well as the city’s own operations with just four standing committees.
“This is direct product of the … Ford meddling in the city,” she said. “We’re having to shrink some of our accountability functions.”
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Mr. Tory, addressing reporters at a groundbreaking ceremony for the massive Port Lands flood-protection project on Wednesday, said he believed the staff report is a thoughtful approach to restructuring council.
The mayor also repeated his call for an increase in councillors’ $240,000 staffing budgets so they can hire more aides to help manage their much-larger wards.
“The number of people being served, which is close to three million in the city of Toronto, has not changed,” he said. “They still need customer service, constituency service. There are now fewer people to serve them.”
The staff report lays out four options regarding council staff and office budgets. Keeping the current staffing levels for councillor aides would save $7.4-million compared with 2018. But it is widely expected that council will approve increases, potentially all but eliminating the $25.5-million over four years that Mr. Ford promised his reduction in council size would save.
Asked on Wednesday at a news conference whether a move to boost councillors’ budgets negates the promised benefits of his plan, Mr. Ford asserted that the cut to council would end up saving millions in “efficiencies.”
Gabriel Eidelman, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, says he hopes the appointment of a special committee to reform council means the committee takes another look at the changes he and a group of experts – including former councillors and senior civil servants – recommended last year to make council run more smoothly.
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Among them were procedural changes that would limit the ability of councillors to spend lengthy periods asking questions of city staff at council meetings, and require mayors to give a kind of annual throne speech to clearly outline their priorities.
“This can’t just be what’s presented here, about rearranging the deck chair,” Dr. Eidelman said. “ … We should take this opportunity to think more deeply about what the city needs going forward.”

Toronto Rehab

University Health Network (UHN) – Toronto Rehab, will be holding an Open House and 
Pre-application meeting to discuss with the community their proposed plans for expanding the Lakeside Long Term Care Centre at 150 Dunn Avenue.
UHN is aiming for construction to begin during the summer of 2020, and be completed in the fall of 2022. But, before construction would start, they need to go through an approvals process with the City. They intend to submit an application to the City early in 2019.
Councillor Perks and City Planning staff will be in attendance. If you
are unable to attend the meeting and are interested in providing comment
and/or receiving more detailed information, please email Councillor Perks
office at councillor_perks@toronto.ca.
1499 Queen St. W. (ParkdalePlace: 
Time:Date:
 Wednesday, Dec. 12th, 2018  5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. (view panels and presentation starts at 6:30 p.m.) Activity-Recreation Centre – PARC) 

last public meeting on new policies for streets, parks, open spaces and building design Dec. 11th

CityplanTO a @CityPlanTO 17h

Don’t miss it! Our last public meeting on new policies for

streets, parks, open spaces and building design is on

December 11, 2018. Drop by Metro Hall Rooms 308/309 from

6230-9130pm to learn more and share your thoughts with us.