Archive for May, 2019

Toronto’s loss of Federal Avenue

According to the projected scheme, it is proposed to lay out a civic centre between the blocks bounded by Queen Street on the south, Agnes Street on the north. University Avenue on the west, and Terauley Street on the east; the City Hall, Osgoode Hall and the Armor- ies to form part of this scheme. An avenue 100 feet wide is to be cut through from Queen Street to Front Street, thus affording direct access from the new Union Station to Queen Street and thence to University Avenue, and Terauley Streets. Directly at the head of this new avenue would be grouped the proposed public buildings both governmental and CIVIC Two of these buildings are shown flanking a fine plaza 200 feet wide, at the head of which a more important building is shown on the main axis of the proposed new avenue. 
The idea of this arrangement being that space for great public demonstrations would be afforded, and that the buildings facing this plaza could be seen to advantage. The incoming traveler’s first impression of Toronto would be materially enhanced by the splendid vista opening up before him. It is proposed that this Federal Avenue should be preserved for vehicular and pedestrian traffic only, and that no street car lines should be allowed. The buildings shown grouped about the plaza have been placed on a line with Osgoode Hall.
Had Toronto’s city elders, private developers and pundits of yesteryear gotten their way, a splendid street called Federal Avenue would stretch straight and wide through the heart of downtown from Union Station up to Queen Street West. A soaring Art Deco skyscraper, stepping up from a grand base, would stand today at the corner of Bay and College streets. And a tall pyramid by visionary planner and architect Buckminster Fuller would rise beside the water’s edge at the foot of a lengthened and straightened University Avenue.
None of these things came to pass. Some fine Toronto dreams, such as the Eaton’s tower at Bay and College, were squashed by the Great Depression. Other mega-schemes, not so fine, were thwarted by public outcries: One thinks of the Spadina Expressway in the late 1960s. The surviving drawings of these projects are traces of the civic ambition that has occasionally swept the city, for better or worse, during the last two centuries.
Toronto’s buildings and urban plans that didn’t happen have long fascinated lawyer and amateur historian Mark Osbaldeston. To celebrate these projects, Mr. Osbaldeston has compiled a forthcoming album called Unbuilt Toronto: A History of the City That Might Have Been. This work will likely become an indispensable companion to William Dendy’s Lost Toronto (1978), the most important text, so far, on its interesting topic.
But you don’t have to wait until November, when Unbuilt Toronto will be launched by Dundurn Press, to get a sense of what Mr. Osbaldeston has been up to.
This morning at the International Interior Design Exposition, in the Direct Energy Centre at Exhibition Place, the author will join forces with acclaimed urban designer Ken Greenberg and architect Michael McClelland to talk about Toronto’s towers, subways, highways, neighbourhoods and buildings that could have been. (The panel discussion, which will accompany a display of images from Unbuilt Toronto, is sponsored by the Toronto Society of Architects.) I talked with Mr. Osbaldeston last week.
“History that never happened! Who cares?” he said. “When you look at these projects, it does make you think about the choices that were made, the roads not taken. You think about how things might have been. Would that have been better? Would it have been worse? Indifferent? … I didn’t want to just show startling or beautiful images, I wanted to know where these [projects]came from, why they were proposed, what was the context in which they were proposed – the broader architectural context. All of the projects I talk about have a story. All my stories have a beginning and an end.”
One scheme Mr. Osbaldeston deals with extensively in his book is the creation of Federal Avenue, proposed in 1911, when beautification was all the rage in American and Canadian cities. Had it been constructed, the street would have revitalized the old downtown warehouse and factory district south of Queen Street, much of which had been devastated by the great fire of 1904.
“That was a plan, basically, for road improvements downtown, but it was informed by the City Beautiful movement, which was about grand urban spaces. … I think it would have given Toronto a sense that this is the centre, that this is downtown, between Union Station and City Hall and important government buildings. It would have provided a great sense of place.”
While nothing was done to make Federal Avenue a reality, Toronto does have architectural hints of other possibilities that never came to full fruition. At least the base of Eaton’s College Street tower was constructed (1928-1930), for example. Mr. Osbaldeston regards the handsome stump as a remnant of one of the most significant things we lost.
“We don’t have the same skyscraper buildings from that era, that some other cities in the Great Lakes area do,” the author said. “To have a building of that size and that calibre! When you look at what got built, the calibre of workmanship, materials – everything would have been spectacular.”
On the other hand, we shouldn’t be shy about thinking and dreaming large about what our city can be.
“When you miss the opportunity,” he says, “you never get it again.”

Parkdale Canoe Club happensings early 1900’s

The Parkdale Canoe Club, which is the “loud noise” in canoeing circles this year in Toronto Clubparts, They had a fair war canoe crew last year, but this year they will be strengthened with some fine young athletes developed by hockey last winter and promise “to be there or thereabouts” when the war canoes and fours races, and the Canadian Henly come off. They have determined to take a-whirl at the Canadian Canoe Association War Canoe Championships and the American Canoe Association events for big canoes. They are a cocky little tribe, these Parkdales, and they are going to take some tall beating too, if youth and stamina will count for much against experience.

The sculpture by Jyhling Lee placed at Shutter St should be recognized as Toronto's most important sculpture of our city.

This work attends the needs of a very important social aspect of this community. The family and housing in the reworking of the Regent Park community.
My opinion was created as the piece was set in place and the days following, with the delight of children and parents of a room outside that you could sit at the table, lay on the bed.
I do not know if Jyhling Lee intended to speak to the community thoughts about the redevelopment of Regent Park.
Yet the community sure does.
Visiting this sculpture, it well worth the travel from any part of the city.

download archive 2008 to 2018 archive TEXT AND IMAGES (must be downloaded by DEC 1 2019)


junctioneer.ca archive download

The archive contains the posts from Apr 2008 to April 2018


The full text all photos and files.

Click the read more blow to see the links to archive
The archive has been deposited at two locations.

thks to all who read the blog

Here are links to the archive of the junctioneer blog, one hosted at onedrive and the other at dropbox. The complete blog from Apr of 2008 to Sept of 2017.

Download and unrar the two rar files, one after the other. It takes about 10 minutes in all, the two files have to be downloaded separately have something to drink while waiting, :-).

You can download the free winrar software to unrar the files here, www.rarlab.com/download.htm
After unraring the two download files, you will have one folder with all the files of the blog re-linked to work just like the online version, only offline. Simply click of the file 000000index to open the blog in your browser for offline viewing.

Sort the files in the folder by name and this file should be at the top. you can of course just scroll though the files in the folder and double click the 000000index or the index file, both produce the same result, opening the blog in your browser.

Remember to have both downloaded files on the desktop or in the same folder.

Read the readme file in the folder to, if like too.

Part 1 at onedrive

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part 2 at onedrive

1drv.ms/u/s!AsW6FEs9ZylhhzyZt2ebAHodlYgb

you can download the free winrar software to unrar the files here

www.rarlab.com/download.htm

 

JUNE 14 – 16 GAMING MUSIC EVENT YONGE AND DUNDAS

22nd annual ART TOUR is a showcase for some of the best art in Toronto’s West End. Artists display their works at locations from Swansea to The Junction.

The 22nd annual ART TOUR is a showcase for some of the best art in Toronto’s West End. Artists display their works at locations from Swansea to The Junction.
Admission is FREE, and art lovers have a unique opportunity to meet the artists and to see their creations.
Visitors are invited to soak up the unique atmosphere of the local community with its delightful mix of shops, cafes, bakeries and restaurants.

There is a draw for three $100 prizes to be used toward an art purchase from any artist on the Tour. Entry forms can be filled out at all the tour sites; enter at each location to increase your chances. Organizers will contact the winners three weeks after the Tour.
Click HERE for more details. Enjoy the show

Toronto Housing has very underwhelming safe standards for work atheights, like hanging a step ladder from the top of a 15 story building.

Taste the Eats and feel the Beats in Toronto’s Riverside neighbourhood!June 1st from 1:00pm to 6:00pm Taste the Eats and feel the Beats inToronto’s Riverside neighbourhood!

Riverside’s Annual Streetfest spans 10 vibrant blocks along Queen St. East between the Don Valley Parkway to just past world-famous De Grassi Street. It’s all happening just across the bridge from Toronto’s Downtown Core. The festival takes place alongside the Riverdale ArtWalk (Jimmie Simpson Park).

The event showcases:
– 50+ local eateries and shops along Queen Street East serve food specials, sidewalk sales, and live entertainment.
– At Broadview Ave & Queen St: Beer Garden from Eastbound Brewing Co, 3 Food demos from Toronto Food Tours and FIVE bands playing from 1pm ’til 9pm, including a DJ Battle!

– And MUCH MORE at 4 other locations!

Join us June 1st from 1:00pm to 6:00pm to enjoy what Riverside has to offer!

For more information and to RVSP, visit: www.riverside-to.com/events/riverside-eats-beats-streetfest/

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. 1888-9. Nee Glenside

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. 1888-9. Nee Glenside
post office and suburb of Toronto, formerly known as Glenside, at the junction of the Ontario and Quebec Railway and the CV lines Canadian Pacific Railway in York Township York Co, 4 miles north-west of Toronto,the county seat and nearest banking point.
It contains Methodist, Baptist, Episcopal and Presbyterian churches and a public school, and has wire-mat and show case factories and other industries. The CP Ry [code language=”plain”][/code] [code language=”plain”][/code] [code language=”plain”][/code] [code language=”plain”][/code] [Noted Persons]

1. J S Kirkwood, postmaster.
2. Armstrong R, drygoods.
3. Baker Henry, furniture.
4. Becker Wm, grocer.
5. Blea D, hotel.
6. Brown J C, waggonmaker.
7. Bruce John B, drygoods.
8. Burgess Robert, restaurant.
9. Canada Wire Mattress Co, (M J Murphy,| Charles A Hart).
10. Causey A, grocer.
11. Christie Edward, builder.
12. Clendenan Daniel W, barrister.
13. Clendenan GW, physician.
14. Cordingly J B, general agent.
15. Cotts John, coal and wood.
16. D’Eye H F, grocer.
17. Dominion Show Case Co (George P Wagner, Carl Zeidler and D C Wagner), office furniture and store fittings.
18. Evans John M, flour and feed.
19. Fisher Edward J T, physician.
20. Fisher James A, boots and shoes.
21. Gilmore John T, physician.
22. Gord George, commission merchant.
23. Green Josiah, druggist.
24. Greenwood William, real estate.
25. Hickey James, grocer.
26. Hickey Patrick, general agent.
27. Hickey Mrs Susan, provisions.
28. Hollingshead & McDonald (Wm H Hollingshead, Alexander McDonald), livery.
29. Hollingsicle Wm H, livery.
30. Hoover & Jackson (Jacob H Hoover, James T Jackson), real estate.
31. Hope John, harnessmaker.
32. James Wm, butcher.
33. Johnson Wm, grocer.
34. Joy Robert B, barber.
35. Kirkwood John S, groceries and provisions.
36. Lapp David, builder.
37. Leigh Robert J, books and toys.
38. Lewis H, butcher .
39. Lewis Wm J , poultry dealer.
40. McCormack & Jackson, coal and wood.
41. McFarlane Allan, drygoods.
42. Macuabb & Fowler (Alexander Macnabb) [issue with source image with second name]
43. Madden F, butcher.
44. Mahoney Mrs, confectionery.
45. Mitchell & Rose, dressmakers.
46. MoHlat Mrs M, dressmaker.
47. Parkdale Lumber Mnfg and Building Co (Ltd), James Stewart pres, Georg SinClair sec-treas.
48. Parry Joseph A, blacksmith.
49. Patterson Mrs T, dressmaker.
50. Peaks Thomas J L & Co (Thomas J L and Edwin W Peake), hardware.
51. Pipher Abraham B, builder.
52. Reading Arthur J, artist.
53. Robinson George, baker.
54. Rosebush Wm, grocer.
55. Rowntree John, butcher.
56. Scott Donald, tailor.
57. Shaw Joseph I, milk dealer.
58. Simmonds Henry, poultry dealer.
59. Sinclair Christopher, hotel.
60. Spears John D, builder.
61. Stewart John, sash mfr.
62. Temperance & General Life Assurance Co, J T Jackson agent. (See
63. Veitch John, provisions.
64. Wagner F W & Co (Frederick W and Jacob
65. P Wagner), planing mill.
66. West I & Co (Isaac West), fruits.
67. West J, provisions.
68. Williams Fdward H, land agent.
69. Wilson Charles, butcher.
70. Wilson Wm, real estate.
71. Wonnacott Albert, dairyman.
72. Wylie Wm J, druggist.

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. 1888-9. Nee Glenside

WEST TORONTO JUNCTION. 1888-9. Nee Glenside
post office and suburb of Toronto, formerly known as Glenside, at the junction of the Ontario and Quebec Railway and the CV lines Canadian Pacific Railway in York Township York Co, 4 miles north-west of Toronto,the county seat and nearest banking point.

It contains Methodist, Baptist, Episcopal and Presbyterian churches and a public school, and has wire-mat and show case factories and other industries. The CP Ry

 

 

[Noted Persons]

1. J S Kirkwood, postmaster.

2. Armstrong R, drygoods.

3. Baker Henry, furniture.

4. Becker Wm, grocer.

5. Blea D, hotel.

6. Brown J C, waggonmaker.

7. Bruce John B, drygoods.

8. Burgess Robert, restaurant.

9. Canada Wire Mattress Co, (M J Murphy,| Charles A Hart).

10. Causey A, grocer.

11. Christie Edward, builder.

12. Clendenan Daniel W, barrister.

13. Clendenan GW, physician.

14. Cordingly J B, general agent.

15. Cotts John, coal and wood.

16. D’Eye H F, grocer.

17. Dominion Show Case Co (George P Wagner, Carl Zeidler and D C Wagner), office furniture and store fittings.

18. Evans John M, flour and feed.

19. Fisher Edward J T, physician.

20. Fisher James A, boots and shoes.

21. Gilmore John T, physician.

22. Gord George, commission merchant.

23. Green Josiah, druggist.

24. Greenwood William, real estate.

25. Hickey James, grocer.

26. Hickey Patrick, general agent.

27. Hickey Mrs Susan, provisions.

28. Hollingshead & McDonald (Wm H Hollingshead, Alexander McDonald), livery.

29. Hollingsicle Wm H, livery.

30. Hoover & Jackson (Jacob H Hoover, James T Jackson), real estate.

31. Hope John, harnessmaker.

32. James Wm, butcher.

33. Johnson Wm, grocer.

34. Joy Robert B, barber.

35. Kirkwood John S, groceries and provisions.

36. Lapp David, builder.

37. Leigh Robert J, books and toys.

38. Lewis H, butcher .

39. Lewis Wm J , poultry dealer.

40. McCormack & Jackson, coal and wood.

41. McFarlane Allan, drygoods.

42. Macuabb & Fowler (Alexander Macnabb) [issue with source image with second name]

43. Madden F, butcher.

44. Mahoney Mrs, confectionery.

45. Mitchell & Rose, dressmakers.

46. MoHlat Mrs M, dressmaker.

47. Parkdale Lumber Mnfg and Building Co (Ltd), James Stewart pres, Georg SinClair sec-treas.

48. Parry Joseph A, blacksmith.

49. Patterson Mrs T, dressmaker.

50. Peaks Thomas J L & Co (Thomas J L and Edwin W Peake), hardware.

51. Pipher Abraham B, builder.

52. Reading Arthur J, artist.

53. Robinson George, baker.

54. Rosebush Wm, grocer.

55. Rowntree John, butcher.

56. Scott Donald, tailor.

57. Shaw Joseph I, milk dealer.

58. Simmonds Henry, poultry dealer.

59. Sinclair Christopher, hotel.

60. Spears John D, builder.

61. Stewart John, sash mfr.

62. Temperance & General Life Assurance Co, J T Jackson agent. (See

63. Veitch John, provisions.

64. Wagner F W & Co (Frederick W and Jacob

65. P Wagner), planing mill.

66. West I & Co (Isaac West), fruits.

67. West J, provisions.

68. Williams Fdward H, land agent.

69. Wilson Charles, butcher.

70. Wilson Wm, real estate.

71. Wonnacott Albert, dairyman.

72. Wylie Wm J, druggist.