Archive for September, 2019

Coopers Metals moves off commissioners Street | as city redevelopments area within its flood control site.

 

 

Coopers front door.

 

 

The main metal recycling and sorting plant.

Dewatering madness on the east Queens Quay | water pump out finally succeeds

 

 

 

 

This site of a new office bit, right next to Sugar Beach has had constant flooding up from the ground, ground which is part of land made from infilling the Front  mashes decades ago.

THE HERBAL CLINIC & DISPENSARY window at night. | Roncesvalles Avenue.

The Herbal Dispensary store window, just beautiful,

THE HERBAL CLINIC & DISPENSARY. The herbal dispensary is a fully stocked herb store which is open to the public and staffed by trained Herbalists. 409 Roncesvalles Avenue.

 

Junction BIA announcement, retro-inspired psychedelic pop art party on June 20, 2020.

Junction BIA announcement, retro-inspired psychedelic pop art party on June 20, 2020.

 

The BIA’s web site only, still only points out the solace festival.

Toronto’s Waterfront at War, 1914-1918

 

All text, Toronto World
Toronto’s Waterfront at War, 1914-1918

| military contracts let to private waterfront concerns often fell outside the territorial and operational jurisdiction of the local port authority, and hence were not reflected in its records. Just as there was never a single, centralized agency that established policies and guidelines for waterfront development throughout the nation, there is no single repository that provides the materials necessary for a detailed examination of harbour activities during the war years.

 

In spite of the board’s willingness to sell inshore sites, a policy that prohibited the purchase of property fronting onto the harbour’s new dockwalls led to many manufacturers accepting the attractive benefits offered by nearby cities such as Hamilton.

Those industrial or commercial concerns that agreed to locate along Toronto’s shoreline enjoyed lease- hold rather than freehold tenure, and the port authority maintained comprehensive records of its tenants’ activities.

Toronto Harbour Commission was well-suited for this role, for it owed its existence to a protracted struggle to develop the industrial capacity of the water- front.14 By the beginning of the twentieth century it had become apparent that the existing port authority, the Harbour Trust, was an ineffective agent to deal effec- tively with the myriad problems that plagued Toronto’s waterfront. The lack of coordinated development within the harbour, coupled with the extremely disruptive activities of the railways, left wharves ramshackle and neglected
Highlight (color #D3D2EE): Located at the east end of the harbour, the bay’s 1,200 acres of marsh lands and shallow waters, long con- sidered a prime site for industrial development, was the dominant issue in the campaign for a new port authority. These local designs were not lost on the federal government,

But the harbor was only secondary to the industrial area that was to be developed, with parks third. The basic idea was to reclaim 2,000 acres of waterfront land, of which 800 were to be parks and 1,200 for indus- trial purposes.

This “basic idea” was the Toronto Harbour Commission’s Waterfront Plan of 1912, which featured the reclamation of Ashbridge’s Bay using 27 million cubic yards of dredged fi11.16 It was an ambitious undertaking estimated to cost over $19,000,000, but within months the harbour commission had won the support of both the federal and municipal governments.

The reclamation of the marsh lands began in May 1914, and the citizens of Toronto eagerly awaited the wholesale transformation of their waterfront over the next six years.

Toronto was R. Home Smith.
| residential development of large areas along Toronto’s Humber Valley,
had put Smith into contact with most of the financial titans of Britain and North America.

He had also served as a harbour commissioner since 1911, so that the sale of the British Forgings plant was a matter of more than passing concern. It proved to be a greater challenge than initially anticipated, but perseverance eventually paid off when a Welsh firm, Baldwins Limited, agreed in May 1919 to take over the site in an attempt to recapture the Canadian sheet steel and tin plate market that had been lost by Britain to the United States during the war.

The venture was unsuccessful, and the plant was leveled in the 1920s to make way for the tanks of the McColl-Frontenac Oil Co. Ltd., the predecessor of Texaco Canada Inc. The once-impressive plant would soon be remembered only by a local road named Munitions Street, but for two brief years it was the central fixture in the development of Toronto’s eastern waterfront

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R. Home Smith | king developer of the Humber Valley.

Toronto was R. Home Smith.  In residential development of large areas along Toronto’s Humber Valley. Smith was in contact with most of the financial titans of Britain and North America.

He had also served as a harbour commissioner since 1911, so that the sale of the British Forgings plant was a matter of more than passing concern. It proved to be a greater challenge than initially anticipated, but perseverance eventually paid off when a Welsh firm, Baldwins Limited, agreed in May 1919 to take over the site in an attempt to recapture the Canadian sheet steel and tin plate market that had been lost by Britain to the United States during the war.

The venture was unsuccessful, and the plant was leveled in the 1920s to make way for the tanks of the McColl-Frontenac Oil Co. Ltd., the predecessor of Texaco Canada Inc. The once-impressive plant would soon be remembered only by a local road named Munitions Street, but for two brief years it was the central fixture in the development of Toronto’s eastern waterfront

By 1900, at least three shipyards were producing steel-hulled vessels along the central waterfront, and prospects looked good for continued growth as orders were steadily arriving from Canadian and international sources.

 

High Park Community Alliance GIANT Yard Sale! | to support their efforts to restrain new tower blocks in North High Park

 

Our next Fundraising event is:
High Park North – GIANT Yard Sale!

Saturday September 28th 9:30am-3pm
Location: Next to the BBQ area @ 66 Oakmount

For sale: Kitchenware, toys, sports gear, furniture, baked goods, pet supplies, gift certificates

Donations Needed: Bring donated items to 66 Oakmount Friday September 27th after 6pm (bring large items at 9am on Saturday September 28th).

Please NO: clothing, books, damaged items.

Questions: highparkcommunityalliance@gmail.com

We need volunteers for:

 Sorting & Pricing
Friday September 27 from 6 – 9pm

Selling 
September 28
1) All Day from 8 am to 3 pm
2) Morning 8 am to 12 pm
3) Afternoon 12 pm to 3 pm

Clean up 
September 28 from 3 – 4 pm

*Refreshments provided*

To volunteer, please email Cathy Brown at nepalcathy@hotmail.com

High Park Community Alliance update | community group concerned about 7 tall towers to the existing cluster of High Park North buildings

all text from the group, as is the image.

High Park Community Alliance enjoyed one of its most successful fundraising ventures so far, which culminated at the Village Playhouse performance of The Glass Menagerie.

Approximately $3900 was raised from July 31st,  when our volunteers first began selling tickets, to September 5th, the night of the show.

Thanks are due to our volunteers who spoke to many of you about the impending OMB (LPAT) hearing in January 2020, and the need to team up with the City to confront the outrageous proposals to add another 7 tall towers to the existing cluster of High Park North buildings.

We thank you who bought tickets, and to the many people who made donations in lieu of buying tickets.

You support will go a long way to paying the legal costs HPCA is already incurring in preparation for the OMB challenge.

The longest part Don Roadway will be gone in a few days.

Below

 

the roadway as it sits on sept 11th 2019 ooking south from Comissioners St.

 

 

Below

looking  at the short stretch that will remain, a few hundred meters that becomes the DV

 

Two men who are barrel recyclers in the Junction area of Toronto

Digital Image Number: I0021492.JPG
Title: Two men who are barrel recyclers in the Junction area of Toronto
Date: 1990
Place: TORONTO (ONT.)
Creator: Robert Teteruck
Format: Black and white print
Reference Code: F 4445-3
Item Reference Code: F 4445-3-0-0-7
Subject: RECYCLING,LABORERS