All posts in 150 Symes Road Symes Road Incinerator

The Symes Rd train Wall

“When the wall was built originally it suppose to serve as a sound wall. Now that there is no track behind it something should be done to reduce its height. 100 Symes now has 15+ businesses including a brewery (Rainhart) + Sports gym (Monkey Vault). People are getting lost driving around trying to figure out how to get across. A simple rail will do to prevent traffic.”

As a sound barrier wall from the train noise, the wall had a a very short life. The land that was the rain tracks was then sold to St Helens Meat packers which uses it as a parking lot for their employees. The wall most probably belongs to the City of Toronto, or the development if the houses built on the sound side of the wall at are some type of condo development.

The best solution to increased traffic on the south side of the wall now that is looking for 100 Symes Rd. would be directional signage.

However the wall does present a rather special iconic reuse that retains the memory of the tracks that once fed the Canada Packers site.

 

 

Who is Adam The Woo – A Documentary – more Junction than you think

 

 

This post is about places. Adam the Woo is an urban adventurer who documents his visits disused and abandoned places on a YouTube channel. His efforts to communicate the importance of places in communities and visitations to various disused industrial buildings all have a real connection to the Greater Junction Area. Our area has some very hard-core urban explorers. Some simply visiting out of interest, while others seek the history and value to our community from their visits. We also have so many places and things that need to explored and documented.

Adams commitment to produce videos of so many places – even Toronto – is great and his methods are simply wonderful.

Below is a documentary by Kenny Johnson with Adam the Woo which provides a glimpse into a staggering body of work.

If above embed is not working on your devise here is the direct URL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90fxDxv5r9Y&feature=youtu.be

Adams web site Http://www.adamthewoo.com/

 

 

150 Symes Road proposed – Amendment No. 231 to the Official Plan Designations and Mapping for Employment Areas

150 Symes Road city plan chnage image All text proposed – Amendment No. 231 to the Official Plan of the City of Toronto with respect to the Economic Health Policies and the Policies, Designations and Mapping for Employment Areas  Page 69

 

Chapter 7, Site and Area Policies, is amended by adding Site and Area Specific Policy No. 425 for the lands known municipally in 2012 as 150 Symes Road, as follows:   In addition to all the uses provided for in the Core Employment Areas designation the following uses shall be permitted: a) Service commercial, and indoor recreational and entertainment uses are permitted through the enactment of a zoning by-law; b) Institutional uses, including post-secondary trade schools that are ancillary to and/or supportive of the site’s employment uses are also permitted through the enactment of a zoning by-law; c) The above noted uses are potentially sensitive uses. Prior to the enactment of any zoning by-law amendment a study will be submitted by the applicant that evaluates, to the satisfaction of the City in consultation with the Ministry of the Environment, how the potentially sensitive use would affect the ability of existing and planned industrial, warehouse, utility, transportation and city yard uses along Glen Scarlett Road to carry out normal business activities.   The study also evaluate whether the anticipated users will potentially be subject to adverse effects from on-site contamination or from odour, noise and other contaminants that are discharged from existing and planned industrial, warehouse, utility, transportation and city yard uses along Glen Scarlett Road.   d) The applicant shall submit studies demonstrating to the City’s satisfaction that there will be no, or minimal impacts related to the redevelopment of the site on the residential area located to the south. The study will assess, among other matters as identified during the application process, impacts associated with traffic, parking and noise and identify any mitigation measures to be undertaken by the applicant.”

 

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What now for 150 Symes Rd now that it has been sold? (heritage incinerator building)

Build Toronto has stated it has sold the Symes Rd heritage incinerator building, this blog stuttered at the prospect of what could happen to the building and site.

It appears Build Toronto has brokered a deal and provided funding for the development by way of a vendor take back mortgage.

here is part of Build Toronto’s statement on the sale,

The investor’s vision to retain the entirety
of the building for adaptive re-use was articulated
to Heritage staff, who threw their enthusiastic
support behind this project. Where development
proposals for heritage buildings typically involved
maintaining only the façade of a building and
constructing new within, this was amongst
the only development proposals presented to
Heritage staff that intended to preserve the
architectural integrity of the building in its entirety.

fsc_www_buildtoronto_ca_sites_default_files_files_Case_Story_150_Symes_1_pdf

 

Backing from all of these stakeholders as well as
Councillor Frances Nunziata ultimately helped
move this deal forward. BUILD TORONTO is also
offering flexible financing for this site through
a Vendor Take Back mortgage, taking on some
of its risk to demonstrate its firm belief in this
adaptive reuse development

Full case study from Build Toronto hosted here at the blog and here at Build Toronto.

 

Council to consider placing Symes Road Incinerator on City Inventory of Heritage Properties – yea

This item will be considered by Etobicoke York Community Council on June 18, 2013. It will be considered by City Council on July 16, 2013, subject to the actions of the Etobicoke York Community Council.

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Description from the file, http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58639.pdf

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value,

The Symes Road Incinerator is a well-crafted excellent representative example of a public works building designed with Art Deco features, which is particularly distinguished by its pyramidal massing, banding and linear decoration that are hallmarks of the style. It is part of a collection of civic architecture in the former City of Toronto with Art Deco styling that dates to the early 1930s and includes the landmark Horse Palace at Exhibition Place. The Office of the City Architect designed the Symes Road Incinerator in a collaboration between Chief Architect J. J. Woolnough, his assistant and successor K. S. Gillies, and their chief designer, architect Stanley J. T. Fryer. During the early 1930s, this team produced an impressive series of civic buildings that were characterized and distinguished by Art Deco styling and included the Symes Road Incinerator. Contextually, the property at 150 Symes Road is historically associated with its surroundings as a notable survivor from the industrial enclave anchored by the former Ontario Stockyards that developed in the early 20th century along St. Clair Avenue West, west of Weston Road in West Toronto. Heritage Attributes The heritage attributes of the property at 150 Symes Road are: The Symes Road incinerator The materials, with brick cladding and brick, stone, metal and glass detailing The scale, form and massing of the near-square three-storey plan, with the two- storey section set back from and rising above the single-storey podium that is angled at the northeast corner The base with window openings, which is raised on the rear (west) elevation with ramps and openings for cargo doors, The cornices along the rooflines of the first and third stories and, at the east end, the chimney On the principal (east) façade, the entrance block where the main entry is asymmetrically placed The main (east) entry, which is set in a stone frontispiece where paired doors and a transom are flanked by narrow sidelights and surmounted by a metal canopy, the datestone incised “1933”, and linear stone detailing The secondary opening at the north end of the east façade The fenestration on all elevations, with flat-headed openings and, in the third storey, distinctive round windows The Art Deco detailing that includes the distinctive horizontal banding The original placement and setback of the Symes Incinerator near the southwest corner of Symes Road and Glen Scarlett Road where it is viewed from both streets.

fsc_www_toronto_ca_legdocs_mmis_2013_ey_bgrd_backgroundfile_58639_pdf

 

 

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Symes Road Incinerator As the City of Toronto grew geographically through annexations that included West Toronto and its population increased with the immigration boom after 1900, the need for municipal services intensified. This “rapid growth generated more garbage while reducing the areas available for dumping,” the strategy the municipality had used since its incorporation.5 However, the City’s first incinerator for burning garbage was in place in 1890 and, after Toronto’s Street Cleaning Department was created in 1910, it commissioned three garbage “destructors” (Image 9). Following the construction of the Island Incinerator on Toronto Island (1916), the Don Incinerator (1917) opened on Dundas Street East overlooking the Don Valley to serve the east part of the municipality, and the Wellington Incinerator (1925) was located on Wellington Street West near Bathurst Street to handle refuse in the west area of Toronto (Images 10 and 11).6 While planning a new facility for the growing northwest sector, in 1931 the City purchased a six-acre parcel of land on Symes Road. The property extended across the border between Toronto and York Township, with the majority of the site in the latter community. Negotiations between the two municipalities resulted in approval of the plant, with the agreement that Toronto would incinerate garbage from the township.7 Before preparing the plans for the Symes Road Incinerator, City staff visited recently constructed garbage facilities in Buffalo and the New York City area and decided to utilize the latest crane-operating technology at the new complex. In June 1932, City Council authorized funding for the construction and maintenance of the “buildings, machinery and plant necessary for a new refuse disposal plant on the west side of Symes Road” (Images 14 and 15)8 Archival records and photographs trace the construction of the Symes Road Incinerator and the adjoining pair of massive brick stacks or chimneys in 1933, with the neighbouring garage completed the next year along with the paving, fences and gates (Images 16-22 and 25).9 Officially opened in 1934, the facility followed the protocol for other incinerators that “were designated by number or location” rather than being named for an individual.

fsc_www_toronto_ca_legdocs_mmis_2013_ey_bgrd_backgroundfile_58639_pdf (2)

 

The Symes Road Incinerator bears the stylistic influence of architect Stanley T. J. Fryer (1885-1956), who was employed as a designer in the City Architect’s office from 1931 to 1936. Fryer received his training in England before gaining experience with leading architectural firms in Boston and New York City. He practiced with partners in Hamilton, Ontario prior to and following World War I, and in the 1920s assisted the internationally recognized architects C. Howard Crane and Albert Kahn with industrial complexes in Detroit and Windsor, Ontario.15 This was the period when Kahn was designing in the popular Art Deco style, including Detroit’s landmark Fisher Building (1928) as the headquarters of an auto supplies conglomerate. A past president of the Ontario Association of Architects (1923-24), Fryer relocated to Toronto at the outset of the Great Depression to serve as a draftsman at the esteemed architectural firm of Darling and Pearson.

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1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.
The City Planning Division recommends that:

1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.

2. City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

3. If there are no objections to the designation in accordance with Section 29(6) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the bill in Council designating the property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

4. If there are objections in accordance with Section 29(7) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council direct the City Clerk to refer the designation to the Conservation Review Board.

5. If the designation is referred to the Conservation Review Board, City Council authorize the City Solicitor and appropriate staff to attend any hearing held by the Conservation Review Board in support of Council’s decision on the designation of the property.

Summary:
This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act. At its meeting of January 18, 2011, the Etobicoke York Community Council (EY3.37) directed Heritage Preservation Services to report on the heritage potential of the site, which contains the former Symes Road Incinerator (1933). In 2009, the property was transferred to Build Toronto, which has sold the site.

Following research and evaluation, staff have determined that the property at 150 Symes Road meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the Ontario Heritage Act. The designation of the property would enable City Council to manage alterations to the site, enforce heritage property standards and maintenance, and refuse demolition.

Financial Impact:
There are no financial implications resulting from the adoption of this report.

Background Information:
(May 10, 2013) Report from the Director, Urban Design, City Planning Division regarding an Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58639.pdf)

17a Toronto Preservation Board Recommendations – Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road

Origin
(May 31, 2013) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board

Recommendations:
The Toronto Preservation Board recommends to the Etobicoke York Community Council that:

1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.

2. City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

3. If there are no objections to the designation in accordance with Section 29(6) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the bill in Council designating the property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

4. If there are objections in accordance with Section 29(7) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council direct the City Clerk to refer the designation to the Conservation Review Board.

5. If the designation is referred to the Conservation Review Board, City Council authorize the City Solicitor and appropriate staff to attend any hearing held by the Conservation Review Board in support of Council’s decision on the designation of the property.

Summary:
The Toronto Preservation Board on May 29, 2013 considered a report (May 10, 2013) from the Director, Urban Design, City Planning Division, respecting Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road.

Background Information:
(May 31, 2013) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board regarding 150 Symes Road – Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58996.pdf)

 

 

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