All posts in 200 Annette Street (Church)

Baptist Church at 200 Annette was officially designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

While at the present time the church is being converted to  condos with the majority of construction  within the existing brick shell and plot of the building, with exceptions such as  the north elevation where extensive alterations would be made. Its two main street elevations will retain their historical characteristics while undergoing renovations to accommodate new windows and doors.

from the city report..

The applicant has applied for Committee of Adjustment and Site Plan approvals to convert the existing place of worship into eight residential condominium units.
This report addresses the application to adaptively reuse the church structure as a residential condominium.  The proposed alterations are necessary to accommodate the new use of the building and the project retains the original structure of the church.  The majority of the construction would occur within the existing shell and floor plate of the building with the exception of the north elevation where extensive alterations would be made.
The two main street elevations will retain their important characteristics while
undergoing alterations to incorporate new windows and doors.  The north elevation will be altered to provide windows, dormer windows, small decks and covered parking constructed within the existing brick buttresses.  The east elevation will be altered to

The applicant has applied for Committee of Adjustment and Site Plan approvals to convert the existing place of worship into eight residential condominium units.This report addresses the application to adaptively reuse the church structure as a residential condominium.  The proposed alterations are necessary to accommodate the new use of the building and the project retains the original structure of the church.  Themajority of the construction would occur within the existing shell and floor plate of the building with the exception of the north elevation where extensive alterations would be made.The two main street elevations will retain their important characteristics while undergoing alterations to incorporate new windows and doors.  The north elevation will be altered to provide windows, dormer windows, small decks and covered parking constructed within the existing brick buttresses. ….full report

thanks to David for noting this too me

200 Annette Street – Toronto Preservation Board On council agenda for Tuesday, August 17, 2010

200 Annette Street – Alteration to a Heritage Property and Intention to Designate, Part IV, Section 29, Ontario Heritage Act and Authority to Enter Into a Heritage Easement Agreement

Owner is seeking to have City Council approve the alterations to the property at 200 Annette Street, as designed by their Michael Hatch Designs Ltd.

from the city report…

Background
The property at 200 Annette Street (Attachment No. 2) contains the building formerly
known as the Annette Street Baptist Church. Constructed in 1888, the church was subject
to significant alterations in 1906 when the original west tower was replaced and the
building extended to the west. In 1920 a new entrance vestibule was added to the west
end of the structure.
Proposal
The proposed condominium development includes the rehabilitation of the church
building into eight residential units.
Alterations to the front (west) façade are minor and include:
new recessed entrance doors beneath existing windows at south side
new small window in centre panel of “blind belfry” in south west tower
replacement entrance doors
Alterations to the south (Annette Street) façade include:
new entrance doors within the masonry window opening of each bay by lowering the
sill to grade; retain the original window openings as transoms and original glazing
where possible
new skylights, matching the roof in colour, on two levels centrally located in each
bay of the south-facing roof; existing dormers to remain
new small window in centre panel of “blind belfry” in south west tower
Alterations to the east façade include:
new entrance door in existing window opening at south end by lowering window sill
construct 2nd and 3rd floor additions behind south east tower
Alterations to the north façade include:
new windows in wall, new dormer windows in roof, small decks and covered
parking, centred on existing bays and between existing buttresses
new skylights in north side of entrance vestibule roof
new window in entrance vestibule at basement level
grade level lowered to provide parking access at basement level
200 Annette Street – Alteration to a Heritage Property, Intention to Designate, Part IV, Section 29,
Ontario Heritage Act and Authority to Enter Into a HEA 5
Heritage Comments
The proposed alterations are acceptable in order to rehabilitate the church structure for
condominium use. The original structure is to be retained and conserved with alterations
to the north and east elevations. The addition of dormers and decks to the north elevation
is acceptable as it has limited physical and visual impact on the cultural heritage value of
the building. The front (west) and side (south) elevations will be conserved with minor
alterations.

The rehabilitation proposal is found to be in accordance with the Parks Canada Standards
and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places.
Reasons for Designation

Staff is requesting as a condition of approval that the property at 200 Annette Street be
designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act. The attached Heritage Property
Research and Evaluation Report (Attachment No. 4) outlines the historical, architectural
and contextual background of the property, and evaluates it according to the provincial
criteria prescribed for municipal designation (Ontario Regulation 9/06). The Etobicoke
York Community Preservation Panel provided historical information that assisted in the
research and evaluation of the site.

The Reasons for Designation (Statement of Significance) are found in Attachment No. 3.
The property at 200 Annette Street is worthy of designation for its cultural heritage value,
and meets the criteria for municipal designation prescribed by the Province of Ontario
under the three categories of design, associative and contextual value. Located on the
northeast corner of Annette Street and High Park Avenue, Annette Street Baptist Church
(1888, with additions in 1906 and 1920) has historical importance as an institution of
significance in the West Toronto Junction community, where it features a well-crafted
design influenced by Arts and Crafts styling and stands as a local landmark.

Background


Annette Street Baptist Church

Description

The property at 200 Annette Street is worthy of designation under Part IV, Section 29 of

the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value, and meets the criteria for

municipal designation prescribed by the Province of Ontario under the three categories of

design, associative and contextual value. Located on the northeast corner of Annette

Street and High Park Ave, Annette Street Baptist Church (constructed in 1888, with

subsequent additions) is a single-storey church building. The site was listed on the City

of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties in 1998.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value

Annette Street Baptist Church is an institution of historical importance to the West

Toronto Junction community. The area was developed in the 1880s after the Canadian

Pacific Railway opened its West Toronto freight yard, which attracted industry,

residential subdivisions, and institutions including churches. Following the incorporation

of the Village of West Toronto in 1884 (which became the Town of West Toronto

Junction, the Town of Toronto Junction and the City of West Toronto prior to its

annexation by the City of Toronto in 1909), Annette Street Baptist Church opened in

1889 and served the spiritual and social interests of the community for nearly a century.

While Annette Street Baptist Church incorporates elements of the popular architectural

styles of the late 1800s, particularly features from High Victorian Gothic Revival and

Romanesque Revival, its overall character recalls the Arts and Crafts influences of the

late 19th century. While local builder John Turner is credited with its construction, the

design of Annette Street Baptist Church resembles one developed for small-scale

churches by Toronto architect Edmund Burke and published in The Canadian Baptist

magazine in 1886. The exaggerated pitch and flared eaves of the roof were retained in

the design when the structure was extended to the west (1906), with the west entrance

(1920) displaying complementary Arts and Crafts detailing.

Contextually, as a church placed on a corner lot at a major intersection in the

neighbourhood, Annette Street Baptist Church is a landmark in the West Toronto

community. It is an integral part of the collection of churches that contributes to the

character of Annette Street as an institutional corridor where Annette Street Baptist

Church is historically, visually and physically linked to its surroundings.

Heritage Attributes

The heritage attributes of the property at 200 Annette Street are:

200 Annette Street – Alteration to a Heritage Property, Intention to Designate, Part IV, Section 29,

Ontario Heritage Act and Authority to Enter Into a HEA 10

The church building

Historical photograph of Annette Street Baptist Church, prior to 1906 when the building was extended to the west and altered (Source: The Leader and Recorder (Winter 1996), 8)

The scale, form and massing of the rectangular plan that rises one extended storey

above a stone base with window openings, the application of red brick cladding with

brick, stone and wood detailing

The steeply-pitched gable roof with the flared eaves, gabled dormers and, at the

northwest corner, an extended brick chimney

At the southwest and southeast ends, the corner towers with pyramidal roofs, flared

eaves and, on the west tower, brick finials (which have been altered)

The east tower (1888), which contains the original entrance to the church and has

segmental-arched openings with decorative hood moulds

The round-arched openings, many of which are organized by brick buttresses and

contain leaded glass windows

The distinctive round window on the west façade

On the west façade facing High Park Avenue, the single-storey entrance porch with

its steeply-pitched gable roof with flared eaves, oversized wood brackets, halftimbering,

and monumental round-arched entry

The datestone, labelled “A.D. 1888 & 1906” (at the base of the west tower)

The placement and setback of the building on the corner lot

full report




200 Annette Street – hoarding goes up

Wednesday the 23rd of June 2010

It’s happening the hoarding is going up and soon the simple elegance of the church will be gone and replaced by homes. While homes will lessen the street-scape – this developer is retaining enough that the church will still be visible to the mind.

200 Annette Street – details of development

  • A 4.57m wide driveway is proposed, 6.0m is required bylaw.
  • Parking Spot width of 2.74m is requested, 3.2 is required
  • The dormer height on the north side is 10.42m, 10.0m is the maximum allowable height even though the roof of the church is much higher than 10.0m
  • The proposed residential gross floor area (GFA) is 583m2 which exceeds the allowable amount by over 350m2.  The actual church is not getting significantly bigger with the condo conversion but GFA for residential is different than it is for churches.

Other notes:

  • To accommodate the driveway and parking area the site plan calls for the removal of 2 mature trees including one large tree on High Park Ave and one at the back of the site.
  • New entrance door on the west facade.
  • Five new entrance doors on the south facade
  • 10 new skylights on the south roof.
  • The site plans notes “relocate bus shelter”.  I think this is to improve the unit 1 patio view but I wonder what the TTC is going to say about that.

Text in italics from Martin L of the JRA

I hope a few facts and drawings help clear up some questions about this project.

Martin Lennox JRA co-chair

200 Annette Street – tree falls

200 Annette Street has had one of the beautiful trees on the site come down during the brick repairs. thanks to David W. for informing us of this.

200 Annette Street – Committee of Adjustments

200 Annette Street – Committee of Adjustments

With lots of action around 200 Annette Street this week, I thought I would take a trip to Etobicoke and take a look at the proposal.  The developer’s website has some drawings of the proposal which closely resemble the drawings which I saw on file at the Committee of Adjustments.  http://terrafirmahomes.com/loft-in-toronto.html

The development requires 4 minor variances which are before the Committee of Adjustments on May 20.  The developer still has time to make changes but below is a laymen’s list of what was in the file on April 29.

  • A 4.57m wide driveway is proposed, 6.0m is required bylaw.
  • Parking Spot width of 2.74m is requested, 3.2 is required
  • The dormer height on the north side is 10.42m, 10.0m is the maximum allowable height even though the roof of the church is much higher than 10.0m
  • The proposed residential gross floor area (GFA) is 583m2 which exceeds the allowable amount by over 350m2.  The actual church is not getting significantly bigger with the condo conversion but GFA for residential is different than it is for churches.

Other notes:

  • To accommodate the driveway and parking area the site plan calls for the removal of 2 mature trees including one large tree on High Park Ave and one at the back of the site.
  • New entrance door on the west facade.
  • Five new entrance doors on the south facade
  • 10 new skylights on the south roof.
  • The site plans notes “relocate bus shelter”.  I think this is to improve the unit 1 patio view but I wonder what the TTC is going to say about that.

I hope a few facts and drawings help clear up some questions about this project.

Martin Lennox JRA co-chair

Brick repair at 200 Annette St.

The developer of the conversion of this church is beginning with brick  restoration.

200 Annette Street – Czechoslovak Church Development – Update

200 Annette Street – Czechoslovak Church Development - Update Nov 29

Junction Residents Association update on the Czechoslovak Church on the N/E corner of High Park  Photo by  Junction Resents Association co-chair Martin L.

A zoning review has been issued for the Czechoslovak Church on the N/E corner of High Park and Annette.  This property has been up for sale twice in the last year and more than a few developers have had their eye on it.13-12-2009 4-50-22 PM

The zoning review states “convert existing church into an eight unit residential building”.

Looks like they plan to convert the church and not demo it.  Although the handyman shop is an example of how that turns out sometimes.

Hopefully the planers take the time to integrate the church structure and strike a balance of old and new similar to the Victory Lofts down the street.

200 Annette Street – Czechoslovak Church SOLD

The Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec (“the Convention”)  has sold the  200 Annette Street Church which they acquired at the closure of Annette St. Baptist Church at nominal value.  The property was loaned to the Czechoslovak Church since 1980.

Initial report form people who have spoken to the new owners report there intend to rent the church out to many different users, such as church groups, the blog has emailed the new owners to confirm this.