All posts in Junction Meatpacking District

The Symes Rd train Wall

“When the wall was built originally it suppose to serve as a sound wall. Now that there is no track behind it something should be done to reduce its height. 100 Symes now has 15+ businesses including a brewery (Rainhart) + Sports gym (Monkey Vault). People are getting lost driving around trying to figure out how to get across. A simple rail will do to prevent traffic.”

As a sound barrier wall from the train noise, the wall had a a very short life. The land that was the rain tracks was then sold to St Helens Meat packers which uses it as a parking lot for their employees. The wall most probably belongs to the City of Toronto, or the development if the houses built on the sound side of the wall at are some type of condo development.

The best solution to increased traffic on the south side of the wall now that is looking for 100 Symes Rd. would be directional signage.

However the wall does present a rather special iconic reuse that retains the memory of the tracks that once fed the Canada Packers site.

 

 

Who is Adam The Woo – A Documentary – more Junction than you think

 

 

This post is about places. Adam the Woo is an urban adventurer who documents his visits disused and abandoned places on a YouTube channel. His efforts to communicate the importance of places in communities and visitations to various disused industrial buildings all have a real connection to the Greater Junction Area. Our area has some very hard-core urban explorers. Some simply visiting out of interest, while others seek the history and value to our community from their visits. We also have so many places and things that need to explored and documented.

Adams commitment to produce videos of so many places – even Toronto – is great and his methods are simply wonderful.

Below is a documentary by Kenny Johnson with Adam the Woo which provides a glimpse into a staggering body of work.

If above embed is not working on your devise here is the direct URL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90fxDxv5r9Y&feature=youtu.be

Adams web site Http://www.adamthewoo.com/

 

 

Two Canadian Startups Bringing Farm Fresh Produce to Kitchen


All text from techvibes.com

Click here for full story

An online local food hub, the company works with farmer’s markets throughout Toronto to allow people to order locally grown fresh meat and produce. Users can go the site, select individual markets and learn more about each farmer or vendor including their family story and growing practices, what products they’re selling and even their recipes. Orders are delivered to users’ homes of offices with a story rather than a sticker.

FoodStory has launched with three partnering farmer’s markets in Toronto, Leslieville farmers’ market, Regent Park farmers’ market and the farmers’ market at Sick Kids. Eventually they want to be delivering farm fresh food from every one of the 33 markets scattered throughout Toronto.

Matheson said initially it was a challenge convincing some farmer’s that partnering with a startup like FoodStory could be both a sustainable and financially rewarding idea. It makes sense, said the CEO, given that farmer’s markets haven’t changed in many ways over the past 100 years.

“I think some people in agriculture, and this is a stereotype, but they’re not at the forefront of technology, so a lot of them just want to look on in from the outside, see how it goes and join if it looks ok,” the University of Guelph alum told Techvibes.

Click here for full story

Council to consider placing Symes Road Incinerator on City Inventory of Heritage Properties – yea

This item will be considered by Etobicoke York Community Council on June 18, 2013. It will be considered by City Council on July 16, 2013, subject to the actions of the Etobicoke York Community Council.

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Description from the file, http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58639.pdf

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value,

The Symes Road Incinerator is a well-crafted excellent representative example of a public works building designed with Art Deco features, which is particularly distinguished by its pyramidal massing, banding and linear decoration that are hallmarks of the style. It is part of a collection of civic architecture in the former City of Toronto with Art Deco styling that dates to the early 1930s and includes the landmark Horse Palace at Exhibition Place. The Office of the City Architect designed the Symes Road Incinerator in a collaboration between Chief Architect J. J. Woolnough, his assistant and successor K. S. Gillies, and their chief designer, architect Stanley J. T. Fryer. During the early 1930s, this team produced an impressive series of civic buildings that were characterized and distinguished by Art Deco styling and included the Symes Road Incinerator. Contextually, the property at 150 Symes Road is historically associated with its surroundings as a notable survivor from the industrial enclave anchored by the former Ontario Stockyards that developed in the early 20th century along St. Clair Avenue West, west of Weston Road in West Toronto. Heritage Attributes The heritage attributes of the property at 150 Symes Road are: The Symes Road incinerator The materials, with brick cladding and brick, stone, metal and glass detailing The scale, form and massing of the near-square three-storey plan, with the two- storey section set back from and rising above the single-storey podium that is angled at the northeast corner The base with window openings, which is raised on the rear (west) elevation with ramps and openings for cargo doors, The cornices along the rooflines of the first and third stories and, at the east end, the chimney On the principal (east) façade, the entrance block where the main entry is asymmetrically placed The main (east) entry, which is set in a stone frontispiece where paired doors and a transom are flanked by narrow sidelights and surmounted by a metal canopy, the datestone incised “1933”, and linear stone detailing The secondary opening at the north end of the east façade The fenestration on all elevations, with flat-headed openings and, in the third storey, distinctive round windows The Art Deco detailing that includes the distinctive horizontal banding The original placement and setback of the Symes Incinerator near the southwest corner of Symes Road and Glen Scarlett Road where it is viewed from both streets.

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Symes Road Incinerator As the City of Toronto grew geographically through annexations that included West Toronto and its population increased with the immigration boom after 1900, the need for municipal services intensified. This “rapid growth generated more garbage while reducing the areas available for dumping,” the strategy the municipality had used since its incorporation.5 However, the City’s first incinerator for burning garbage was in place in 1890 and, after Toronto’s Street Cleaning Department was created in 1910, it commissioned three garbage “destructors” (Image 9). Following the construction of the Island Incinerator on Toronto Island (1916), the Don Incinerator (1917) opened on Dundas Street East overlooking the Don Valley to serve the east part of the municipality, and the Wellington Incinerator (1925) was located on Wellington Street West near Bathurst Street to handle refuse in the west area of Toronto (Images 10 and 11).6 While planning a new facility for the growing northwest sector, in 1931 the City purchased a six-acre parcel of land on Symes Road. The property extended across the border between Toronto and York Township, with the majority of the site in the latter community. Negotiations between the two municipalities resulted in approval of the plant, with the agreement that Toronto would incinerate garbage from the township.7 Before preparing the plans for the Symes Road Incinerator, City staff visited recently constructed garbage facilities in Buffalo and the New York City area and decided to utilize the latest crane-operating technology at the new complex. In June 1932, City Council authorized funding for the construction and maintenance of the “buildings, machinery and plant necessary for a new refuse disposal plant on the west side of Symes Road” (Images 14 and 15)8 Archival records and photographs trace the construction of the Symes Road Incinerator and the adjoining pair of massive brick stacks or chimneys in 1933, with the neighbouring garage completed the next year along with the paving, fences and gates (Images 16-22 and 25).9 Officially opened in 1934, the facility followed the protocol for other incinerators that “were designated by number or location” rather than being named for an individual.

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The Symes Road Incinerator bears the stylistic influence of architect Stanley T. J. Fryer (1885-1956), who was employed as a designer in the City Architect’s office from 1931 to 1936. Fryer received his training in England before gaining experience with leading architectural firms in Boston and New York City. He practiced with partners in Hamilton, Ontario prior to and following World War I, and in the 1920s assisted the internationally recognized architects C. Howard Crane and Albert Kahn with industrial complexes in Detroit and Windsor, Ontario.15 This was the period when Kahn was designing in the popular Art Deco style, including Detroit’s landmark Fisher Building (1928) as the headquarters of an auto supplies conglomerate. A past president of the Ontario Association of Architects (1923-24), Fryer relocated to Toronto at the outset of the Great Depression to serve as a draftsman at the esteemed architectural firm of Darling and Pearson.

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1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.
The City Planning Division recommends that:

1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.

2. City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

3. If there are no objections to the designation in accordance with Section 29(6) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the bill in Council designating the property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

4. If there are objections in accordance with Section 29(7) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council direct the City Clerk to refer the designation to the Conservation Review Board.

5. If the designation is referred to the Conservation Review Board, City Council authorize the City Solicitor and appropriate staff to attend any hearing held by the Conservation Review Board in support of Council’s decision on the designation of the property.

Summary:
This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act. At its meeting of January 18, 2011, the Etobicoke York Community Council (EY3.37) directed Heritage Preservation Services to report on the heritage potential of the site, which contains the former Symes Road Incinerator (1933). In 2009, the property was transferred to Build Toronto, which has sold the site.

Following research and evaluation, staff have determined that the property at 150 Symes Road meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the Ontario Heritage Act. The designation of the property would enable City Council to manage alterations to the site, enforce heritage property standards and maintenance, and refuse demolition.

Financial Impact:
There are no financial implications resulting from the adoption of this report.

Background Information:
(May 10, 2013) Report from the Director, Urban Design, City Planning Division regarding an Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58639.pdf)

17a Toronto Preservation Board Recommendations – Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road

Origin
(May 31, 2013) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board

Recommendations:
The Toronto Preservation Board recommends to the Etobicoke York Community Council that:

1. City Council include the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) on the City of Toronto Inventory of Heritage Properties.

2. City Council state its intention to designate the property at 150 Symes Road (Symes Road Incinerator) under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

3. If there are no objections to the designation in accordance with Section 29(6) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the bill in Council designating the property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

4. If there are objections in accordance with Section 29(7) of the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council direct the City Clerk to refer the designation to the Conservation Review Board.

5. If the designation is referred to the Conservation Review Board, City Council authorize the City Solicitor and appropriate staff to attend any hearing held by the Conservation Review Board in support of Council’s decision on the designation of the property.

Summary:
The Toronto Preservation Board on May 29, 2013 considered a report (May 10, 2013) from the Director, Urban Design, City Planning Division, respecting Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 150 Symes Road.

Background Information:
(May 31, 2013) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board regarding 150 Symes Road – Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-58996.pdf)

 

 

Junctioneer.ca

Stockyards Mall using brick as part if south facing facade.

As the build if the stockyards mall turns to interiors and facades in areas the street-scape is really changing.

All along St Clair Ave. where the mall is being built was for decades a open field – where some of the Canada Packers plant stood until a fire destroyed the corner block at the north west corner of Keele St. And St Clair Ave.

Junctioneer.ca

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Looks like the whole Old Canada Bread building is now leased out

 

Looks like the Old Canada Bread building is now leased out according to the Metropolitan Reality Leasing Website.

Thanks for reader Manny for posting this in a comment,

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Stockyard traffic jams which used to block many streets in the Junction are not all gone yet.

This image taken this week on Glen Scarlet Rd, is a good old Junction traffic jam. At one time these trucks turning blocked Vine Ave, Ryding Ave, St Clair Ave. West, and West Toronto St. all day.

 

Toronto’s core losing jobs to condos, catches up with the Junction terms of commercial loss?

 

This is a rather interesting article, although it focuses  on the issue as related to office space and not the loss  light engineering, food processing and manufacturing that has devastated the the Junction for 3 decades. The loss of the manuservise corein teh Junction decimated the retail strip of Dundas St. west from which it has not recovered as of yet. Yes its interesting and local now the strip but its not the crowded bustling strip it was from the turn of the century to the late 70’s.

Interesting though the loss of the manuservise core really did little to affect the residential societal styles and modes of home ownership, still cannot figure that out.

 (Toronto Star article)

Toronto’s core losing jobs to condos

 

When Iain Dobson sees another condo or condo-hotel springing up on prime downtown land just steps from the subway, he becomes more convinced than ever that Toronto is risking its own future by trading off jobs for people.

Toronto is reaching a tipping point — a shortage of development-ready land for new office towers at the same time thousands of new financial services jobs are projected for downtown and more companies are looking to return to the city core from the suburbs, says Dobson.

The former commercial brokerage executive and co-author of a report for the Canadian Urban Institute warns that Toronto has allowed construction of so many condo towers on what were meant to be office building sites, there is only enough development-ready land for about 4 million square feet of new office space left in the downtown.

Even the old converted “brick-and-beam” buildings to the west and east of the core, now home to some 18 million square feet of commercial development, are close to being full, says Dobson.

“The area within 500 metres of the subway is prime get yourself to work and back again space and when it gets eaten up by a lot of residential development, you have to wonder where will the new offices go?,” says Dobson.

He points to buildings like the 70-storey Trump Tower and 65-storey Shangri-La Hotel, both hotel and condo developments on land once slated for offices. They are among twelve new highrise condos, with 5,707 new units, under construction in the downtown core right now.

One-third of all jobs in the GTA are office jobs, notes the report, The New Geography of Office Location and the Consequences of Business as Usual in the GTA.

Thirty years ago, 63 per cent of office space was located in the downtown financial district or directly along subway lines. But so many businesses have flocked to the suburbs, as of 2010, 54 per cent of office space was located in the road-dependent 905 regions.

That dramatic shift, thanks to plentiful land and cheap taxes, not only clogged major roads, it turned the core into a one-horse town dominated by the financial services sector.

“The 416 region has become the bedroom community for the 905 regions,” says Dobson.

There is some evidence that’s starting to shift as environmentally conscious companies such as Coke and Telus consolidate suburban operations in the core to ease long commutes and be close to where employees live.

But governments need to do more to ease commercial taxes, integrate transit to growth areas and review land use policies for any developable land within a five-minute walk of subways with a focus on office rather than more condo development.

Commercial realtors say they are managing to find sufficient office space for companies that are looking. Colliers International says, in fact, a number of financial district tenants are moving into new offices on the Railways Lands, which is freeing up hundreds of thousands of feet of prime space in the financial district.

Realtor Cushman & Wakefield notes that almost 4 million square feet of office space has come on stream downtown since 2009 and 5.2 million more is planned. It estimates that’s enough, given current demand, for about nine more years of growth.

 

source

Eduarda’s Poultry and Foodstuffs takeout

 

It’s 9:20 am and the staff at this takeout are cleaning and readying to cook for today’s trade.

Great character view though the window each morning.

At Dupont Ave and Perth Ave.

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Nice to see the drums lined up….

 

 

 

 

Universal Drum Reconditioning Company. 110 Glen Scarlett Rd. Toronto, ON M6N 1P4

 

Wonder laneway

 

 


This lane way which begins were Symes Rd was split and blocked just under two years ago, is a striking walk. On the left, walking east you can view  the unique form of the curved steel uprights and perpendicular wood slating.  Constructed when the new development to the left was built to block noise from a train track siding and probably the factory noise, the wall has weathered  wonderfully in colour and texture.

Attached along it’s length  from Symes Rd. to Gunns Rd are a number of basketball hoops which seem to connect the wall to the back of the homes across the way.

Try walking it on a bright sunny weekend afternoon its wonderful.

 

 

New York Pork on St Clair West comes down

A really long time after the fire.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Interesting talk for Junction folk

 

 

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Join us on Thursday, April 28th as we launch our 2011 Heritage Toronto Walks season with an illustrated lecture on the history of Toronto’s railways, hosted by Derek Boles. Our 2011 Spring walk brochures will be available for pick up as well!

How the Railways Shaped Toronto
Illustrated Lecture

 

On May 16, 1853 the first passenger train steamed out of Toronto from a wooden depot that was located just east of present-day Union Station. Over the next century, the railways had a profound impact on the geography of Toronto and helped transform the city into the commercial centre of Canada. See rare images and animations that illustrate how the railways formed and altered Toronto’s built and natural landscape over the last century and a half. And discover the role that St. Lawrence Hall played in railway history!

DATE: Thursday, April 28th at 7:00pm

SPEAKER:
Derek Boles, Toronto Railway Historical Association,
Author of Toronto’s Railway Heritage

LOCATION: St. Lawrence Hall
157 King Street East (at Jarvis), 3rd Floor – Great Hall

 

Heritage Toronto

Heritage Toronto Events Calendar

East silos to come down and the west silos will stay


Well if anything proves that the Junction is achangen to this author who has always had a connection to the Junction thought out my life it is this.

At 43 Junction Rd the east silos are to come down in Nov. or Dec of this year.

The blogs hopes to publish some in-depth images of them next week.

– Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

St Helen’s Meat Packers Limited organically grows

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The Junction Meatpacking District is growing and entrenching with the new addition to the St Helen’s Meat Packers Limited firm.

Using a open space found at the east south corner of their building and a the portion of their building that served as a major entrance to the building they are created new working and travel space for their enterprize.

The new stairway in the  smaller image above is in the area of a until recently main entrance.

So glad to see this company building up the industrial character of the community