All posts in Railways

Canadian Pacific Railroad line though the Junction, train traffic. Source: The CPR Railway

Rail traffic data in the vicinity of

CP’s Lambton Yard and mile 5.87 of our Galt Subdivision, classified as a Principal Main Line.

The information requested is as follows:

1. Number of freight trains 0700 to 2300: 24 Number of freight trains 2300 to 0700: 9 Number of passenger trains (GO Transit*): 18 *GO Transit passenger service runs weekdays between 0700 & 0845 and then between 1630 & 1930.

2. Average number of cars per train freight: 60 Maximum cars per train freight: 160 Number of cars per train passenger: 13

3. Number of Locomotives per train: 2 (4 max) freight, 1 passenger

4. Maximum permissible speed: 50 mph (freight), 70 mph (passenger)

5. Whistle signal is prohibited approaching public grade crossings through the study area. However, the whistle may be sounded if deemed necessary by the train crew for safety reasons.

6. Considerable shunting and switching carried out in the Lampton Yard is not included in these numbers.

The information provided is based on rail traffic over the past month to May 2016. Variations of the above may exist on a day-to-day basis.

Hei

Canadian Pacific Railroad Station repurposed for community use


PHOTO:

Contextual view, from the southwest, of the Winnipeg Canadian Pacific Railway Station, Winnipeg, 2006 Historic Resources Branch, Manitoba Culture, Heritage and Tourism, 2006

WINNIPEG, MB – There are many untold stories of success by indigenous people in Winnipeg, but one of the first and most remarkable is the story of how a determined group of individuals turned the derelict CP station into a beacon of hope for a generation of young aboriginal people.

The corner of Higgins and Main once had the worst reputation in Winnipeg. It was the centre of seedy bars and prostitutes, a place where only the uncaring or desperate would go at night. That was 25 years ago.Now all that has changed: the bars are gone and new construction has put a bright face on the corner. The catalyst for that change over the past 25 years has been the Aboriginal Centre of Winnipeg Inc., now Neeginan Centre of Winnipeg, along with a collection of agencies that reside in the massive building that used to be the railway station and offices of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

The story of that change is one of courage and conviction, of entrepreneurial spirit laced with a social mission. And it is the remarkable story of a handful of aboriginal people who decided to take control and make change happen for their people in the inner city of Winnipeg.The power symbolBack in the late 1800s, the coming of the railroad to Manitoba was a game changer for everyone living here, most particularly for the First Nations, who were crowded out of their traditional lands to make room for an influx of European settlers.

Many of these settlers came through the CPR station and its adjacent immigration sheds.This massive four-storey, 120,000-square-foot office building, with an elegant hotel attached next door, was built in 1904 to 1905 as a monument to the power of the railroad. It was vacated in 1989, a decade after passenger traffic through the station had ceased and the offices were moved out of province.

Full story here

Hei

Over this event has occurred Tonight CPR train in the Junction Nov 28th 8:15

The Canadian Holiday Train in the Junction in 2008

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Over this event has occurred

The CPR Canadian Holiday Train will be in the Junction on

750 Runnymede Road, in front of Lambton Yard

2016-11-28 8:15 PM 8:30 PM – 9:00 PM

about the train…

Councillor Bill spearheaded getting trains in the year 2008 year moving it here from its downtown stopping place, which took him a number of years.

At each event, the Holiday Train provides a box car stage, a line up of great musical talent and a corporate contribution to the local food bank. The community, in turn, is encouraged to donate food and funds, all of which stays in the community.

This is the 18th year that the Canadian Pacific (CP) Holiday Train has been raising food, money and awareness for food banks in communities across Canada and the U.S.

.

20161114-110933.jpg

20161114-112127.jpg

CPR train in the Junction Nov 28th 8:15

The Canadian Holiday Train will be in the Junction on

750 Runnymede Road, in front of Lambton Yard

2016-11-28 8:15 PM 8:30 PM – 9:00 PM

about the train…

Councillor Bill spearheaded getting trains in the year 2008 year moving it here from its downtown stopping place, which took him a number of years.

At each event, the Holiday Train provides a box car stage, a line up of great musical talent and a corporate contribution to the local food bank. The community, in turn, is encouraged to donate food and funds, all of which stays in the community.

This is the 18th year that the Canadian Pacific (CP) Holiday Train has been raising food, money and awareness for food banks in communities across Canada and the U.S.

.

20161114-110933.jpg

20161114-112127.jpg

CPR train in the Junction Nov 28th 8:15

The Canadian Holiday Train will be in the Junction on

750 Runnymede Road, in front of Lambton Yard

2016-11-28 8:15 PM 8:30 PM – 9:00 PM

about the train…

Councillor Bill spearheaded getting trains in the year 2008 year moving it here from its downtown stopping place, which took him a number of years.

At each event, the Holiday Train provides a box car stage, a line up of great musical talent and a corporate contribution to the local food bank. The community, in turn, is encouraged to donate food and funds, all of which stays in the community.

This is the 18th year that the Canadian Pacific (CP) Holiday Train has been raising food, money and awareness for food banks in communities across Canada and the U.S.

.

20161114-110933.jpg

20161114-112127.jpg

 

info on the Lambton Yard below

 

Lambton Yard is a freight marshalling yard for the Canadian Pacific Railway in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and is located to the west of and contiguous with the West Toronto Yard on the Galt Subdivision. The two were the main freight marshalling yard complex for the CPR in Toronto until replaced by the modern CPR Toronto Yard in Agincourt in April 1964.

Built from 1912 to 1913, Lambton served as mechanical and freight facilities. It also had a roundhouse facility from 1913 to 1960. This infrastructure was replaced by an intermodal freight facility which transferred freight between truck and train, the site of which is now a Walmart store.

It is located to the north of Dundas Street West and south of St. Clair Avenue West, between Runnymede Road and Scarlett Road

 

CPR West Toronto Yard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from West Toronto Yard)

The West Toronto Yard

West Toronto Yard is a small marshalling yard for Canadian Pacific Railway on the Galt Subdivision in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The yard was built in 1882 to relieve stress at the Parkdale Yard and is located near Keele Street and Dundas Street West in The Junction. It was once the main yards for Toronto, but was replaced in that role in April 1964 by the CPR Toronto Yard in Agincourt. The roundhouse was demolished in 1998.

A Rona retail store stands on the site of the former roundhouse and shops. Additional buildings were located along Keele Street such as the car shops, but were demolished for the Keele Centre at 500-530 Keele Street around the 1970s. The turntable from the roundhouse and transfer table from the erecting shops were saved from destruction and relocated to a garden at the back of the Rona property.

Engines from West Toronto formerly served local industry. West Toronto Yard is primary used for storage and classification of CPR’s industrial customers in the Guelph – Islington corridor. CPR’s premier piggyback service, the Expressway originally was sited at West Toronto, but was relocated to Hornby when volume grew too large.

When West Toronto became overcrowded in 1913, an additional yard was built immediately to the west. Called CPR Lambton Yard, it stretches from Runnymede Road to Scarlett Road. Runnymede Road divides the yards. Plans to build a hump class yard on the expanded site were cancelled around 1950. The search for a new site for a new main and modern hump classification yard eventually resulted in the selection of the Agincourt location.

Video of Metrolinx Davenport Diamond Meeting: 2016-04-27

Metrolinx Davenport Diamond Meeting: 2016-04-27

Published on Apr 28, 2016

A mostly complete video of Metrolinx’s meeting regarding the Davenport Diamond Grade Separation on April 27 2016, at St. Sebastien Catholic School 

by Vic Gedris.

Old time trains web site updated March `1st, a site with much about the Junction railroad history

screenshot-www.trainweb.org 2016-03-02 17-26-27

 2016 is the 16th years for the site

 

My all time favorite article on the site is the HISTORY OF PRIVATE SIDINGS article which lists private railroad sidings of the past for the city, the article lists a lot of sidings that were in the Junctions.

Here is a link to their update page.

 

Crude Oil Vapor Pressure Should Be Tested Prior to Rail Transport

Why Crude Oil Vapor Pressure Should Be Tested Prior to Rail Transport

Advances in Petroleum Exploration and Development
Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014, pp. 58-63 by 
Hannes Pichler, Josef Lutz, has a valuable and readable text on the subject title of this post.

Highlight sentences…

Recent crude oil rail car accidents have forced US and Canadian authorities to issue Emergency Testing Orders to ensure safe transportation of crude oils. One crucial parameter in meeting these safety requirements is the testing of the vapor pressure (VP) of crude oil.
This paper explains the impact of highly volatile components inside the crude oil on the vapor pressure measurement. It describes typical VP measurement errors and discusses guidelines and technology for proper crude oil classification.
It offers measurement data to show the effect of sample outgassing and to describe the impact of temperature changes and the vapor-liquid ratio (V/L) on vapor pressure test results. The second part of the paper discusses methods to measure the True Vapor Pressure (TVP) and Bubble Point Pressure (BPP) of Crude Oils for safety purposes.
Key words: Crude oil; Volatility testing; Safety data sheet; Hazardous material regulations (HMR); Emergency testing order; Vapor pressure (VP); ASTM D6377; Reid vapor pressure (RVP); ASTM D323; True vapor pressure (TVP); Vapor-liquid ratio (V/L); Bubble point pressure (BPP); Floating piston cylinder (FPC)

Canadian Pacific Railway gets agreement from US unions, that brings an end to a mileage-based wage system from the steam locomotive era.

DM&E employees join those from CP’s U.S. Class I, Soo Line, who ratified.

 

all text below the railroad

 

The new hourly-rate agreement brings an end to a mileage-based wage system from the steam engine era and provides CP with increased flexibility and transparency, the employee with a cycle with two consecutive days off and the best wages in the industry.

“This negotiated agreement is a major step forward for both parties and represents the biggest win-win that a railway, its employees and operating unions could have,” said Keith Creel, CP’s President and Chief Operating Officer. “The benefits it will provide to all parties, including – at the center of it all – our customers, are immediate and will build month by month and year by year.”

The agreement – which also gives BLET members the ability to participate in the employee share purchase plan – spans three years with an option for either side to revert to the former agreement if written notice is given prior to the beginning of the third year. If neither party reverts, the agreement is extended for two more years.

click image to view their site.

click image to view their site.

CPR Canadian Holiday Train in the Junction Monday, November 30, 2015 8:15pm

 

 

CPR Holiday Train

 
Toronto

​750 Runnymede Road,

in front of Lambton Yard

arrival 8:15 PM        performance 8:30 PM – 9:00 PM

performers Devin Cuddy and Kelly Prescott

 

The wonderful CPR holiday Train is coming, sadly this blog author will not be there, but if you go you will have a great time.

 

all text below CPR

 

​​​What’s a Holiday Train event like?
09_HTlogo_colour

A typical Holiday Train event goes something like this: The train arrives and pulls to a safe stop in front of the crowd. The stage door lowers and the band opens with its first song. After that, a brief presentation takes place with local food bank officials and other dignitaries. Once complete, the band resumes performing a mix of traditional and modern holiday-themed songs.  The whole event lasts about 30 minutes, and once the band plays its farewell show, the boxcar door closes, and the train slips off into the night on its way to the next stop. 

Please make sure that you keep a safe distance away from the train so we can safely continue our journey.

750-Runnymede-Rd-toronto-

 

 

elsewhere local below, Monday, November 30, 2015

 

​Oshawa 680 Laval Drive – Behind Walmart, off Stevenson Road South​ 4:30 PM 4:45 PM – 5:15 PM Devin Cuddy and Kelly Prescott
​Hamilton ​Western approach to Kinnear Yard, opposite Gage Park 7:45 PM 8:00 PM – 8:40 PM Kira Isabella and Wes Mack

 

Goings on at CP rail

click image to view their network.

click image to view their network.

..all text below the CP Rail site

Canadian Pacific clarifies changes to Board of Directors

​​​​Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. (TSX: CP) (NYSE: CP) issued the following statement in response to questions from investors and to address inaccurate speculation concerning the recent board resignations and the health of CEO E. Hunter Harrison:

On July 3, 2015, CP director Stephen Tobias notified CP Board Chairman Gary Colter that he was prepared to resign from the board at a date of the board’s choosing. 

In consultation with Krystyna Hoeg, the Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, Mr. Colter caused the company to issue a press release stating that Mr. Tobias had resigned from the board as of June 29, 2015. The company has subsequently corrected this error. 

Mr. Colter caused this press release to be issued without consulting with the board and without seeking board action to accept Mr. Tobias’ offer to resign.

Because Mr. Tobias was a continuing director of the company through June 30, a majority of CP’s directors were U.S. citizens, and thus CP is no longer eligible for the SEC’s Foreign Private Issuer Exemption and will become a U.S. Issuer beginning in 2016.

The CP board is committed to the highest standards of corporate governance, and strives to be exemplary in this respect. Consistent with this philosophy, Mr. Colter and Ms. Hoeg offered to resign in light of how this issue was handled. The board unanimously accepted their resignations.

Concerning Mr. Harrison’s health, Mr. Harrison recently had stents implanted in order to improve circulation and reduce cramping in his legs. In addition, Mr. Harrison is recovering from a mild bout of pneumonia which has restricted his travel. His full recovery is expected in the coming weeks. He remains actively engaged in the company’s business, but elected not to travel to Calgary to participate in this morning’s earnings call.

Canadian Pacific Railway CPR Folk Festivals, 1928-1931 (a history post)

“While there is Still Time…” :

J. Murray Gibbon and the Spectacle of Difference in Three CPR Folk Festivals, 1928-1931

 

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_canadian_studies/v039/39.1henderson_fig01.html

click image for full size view

Abstract
Between 1928 and 1931, a series of 16 Folk music and handicraft festivals were staged across Canada under the auspices of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The principal architect of the festivals, John Murray Gibbon, would later popularize the now-ubiquitous and immeasurably influential phrase “Canadian Mosaic” to explain his vision of a united Canada comprised of distinct identities. This article establishes the foundational role played by the category “Folk” in Gibbon’s construction of the mosaic metaphor for Canadian cultural identity. It examines the construction of three major festivals and interrogates the very category “Folk” around which they were designed. It establishes connections between the structures of the festivals and the race, class, and gender-based cultural assumptions and ideologies that informed their organizers and participants. Finally, it explores the relationship between Gibbon’s emphasis on antimodern Folk identities and an increasingly intricate Canadian cultural matrix under the conditions of modernity.
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_canadian_studies/v039/39.1henderson_fig06.html

Click image for larger view

Between 1928 and 1931, a series of 16 Folk music and handicraft festivals were staged across Canada under the auspices of the Canadian Pacific Railway.1 Largely the conception and design of enterprising CPR publicity agent J. Murray Gibbon, the festivals were structured in such a way as to reflect a deliberate vision of Canada and Canadians. A great believer in the power and primacy of the Folk, Gibbon conceived of the festivals as a means to promote cultural communication among immigrants and French and British “natives” in Canada.2 The category “Folk” operated for Gibbon on the level of primary, essential identity—he believed in particular racial groupings, or categories, and contended that the essential expression of any racial category was evident in its Folk culture. In developing the series of festivals, Gibbon was reflecting his growing concern that Canada (as a nation comprised of many racial categories) suffered from a paucity of cultural communication and interconnectivity. What was worse, the essential Folk practices and beliefs of each far-flung racial group were seen to be under sustained and concentrated assault as modern Canada moved away from its agrarian beginnings. The fear was thus two-fold: not only were racial groups failing to interact with one another and engage with a cohesive national identity, but the essential identities, the very meanings of each group, were disintegrating through the relentless process of modernity.

The wide success of the 16 Folk festivals did not entirely quell these immediate fears, but did serve as a foundation for a new understanding of cultural difference and community in Canada. Gibbon, who went on to explore the role of racial groups and essential identities more fully in his enormously influential book Canadian Mosaic (1938), stands as a key figure in the development of Canadian cultural identity.3 As the master mosaicist, Gibbon endeavored to impose order on an otherwise disordered cultural landscape through his various constructions of an inclusive Canada. His books, his countless speeches, his radio addresses, and the succession of CPR Folk festivals discussed below all demonstrate the master mosaicist at his life’s work of developing a participatory vision of Canadian identity and culture.

This ideal of the mosaic, apparently evocative yet ultimately imaginary, appeared to Gibbon in 1938 as “a decorated surface, bright with inlays of separate coloured pieces, not painted in colours blended with brush on palate. The original background in which the inlays are set is still visible, but these inlays cover more space than that background, and so the ensemble may truly be called a mosaic” (Gibbon 1938, viii). As he placed the tiles onto that background, arranging his festivals, his first large-scale experiments at the representation of a pluralist Canada, Gibbon may have been aiming towards just such a goal; but it was a pluralism built upon a stable foundation, an immutable background of [End Page 141] white Anglo-Celt (male) hegemony onto which he could manufacture his mosaic. His vision of the mosaic as an immovable surface bedecked by garlands suggests the inevitable unevenness in the power distribution he would develop.

For Gibbon, the work was imperative and pressing. “While there is still time,” he worried in 1938, “let us make a survey of these racial groups—see where they came from, what relationship, if any, they had with each other in Europe, what culture they enjoyed and how much of that culture they have been able to bring with them” (1938, viii). He believed that the representation of racial categories through primitive, archaic Folk expression would simplify cultural communication by breaking down the balkanizing barriers of foreign language, appearance, and values. In brief, Gibbon surmised that all European Folk cultures, when refined to their primitive, pre-modern essences, looked and sounded very much alike.4 The tactic, then, was to celebrate the differences in order to recognize the similarities.

Read the HTML version of the full article here

Rail safety Town Hall by Safe Rail Communities – Friday, June 12 at 7:00 pm-9:30 pm

 

Click on image for full size view.

Click on image for full size view.

all text the group.

Since March 2014, Safe Rail Communities has been advocating for greater safeguards and transparency with respect to the transportation by rail of dangerous goods, particularly volatile crude oil.

Despite the tragic loss of 47 lives during the July 6th, 2013 rail disaster in Lac-Mégantic, Canadians have witnessed two more fiery crude oil derailments in 2015. These derailments occurred within three weeks of each other, and both just outside the same town of Gogoma in northern Ontario. Each of these explosive derailments, as well as those of 2014, demonstrate that Minister Raitt’s response to the situation has been largely ineffective.

Please join us for an informative meeting on this important issue with special guest and moderator, Naomi Klein, and a panel of experts:

  • Ali Asgary: Disaster & Emergency Management Expert
  • Christine Collins: National President, Union of Canadian Transportation Employees
  • Bruce Campbell: Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  • Greg Gormick: Rail Policy Expert

Invited guests include Minister Raitt, NDP Transport Critic Hoang Mai, and Liberal Transport Critic David McGuinty.  Also invited are all GTA MPs with rail lines in their riding, Mayor John Tory, and all Toronto City Councillors.

Please share this event on Facebook and Twitter

We look forward to seeing you there! Doors open at 6:30pm.

Patricia & Helen
Safe Rail Communities

www.saferail.ca

 
WHEN: Friday, June 12 at 7:00 pm-9:30 pm
Doors will open at 6:30pm for the Town Hall
WHERE: Central YMCA Auditorium, 20 Grosvenor
(Yonge and Wellesley)

Railway Age is reporting on Canada’s selection March 11, 2015 of new tank car

 

 

All text below Railway Age – click image to read complete article.

Text: David Thomas railway Age

click Image to visit Railway Age

click Image to visit Railway Age

Transport Canada’s selection March 11, 2015 of new tank car specifications is surely a harbinger of the choice the White House will make later this spring from among the options proposed by U.S. rail and hazmat regulators.

The clue is in Transport Minister Lisa Raitt’s revelation that Canada could not secure U.S. support for advanced braking systems for oil trains—a clear inference that agreement has been reached on the other specifications for a future TC/DOT-117 tank car.

Sticking a “TC” in front of the U.S. “DOT-117” designation makes it pretty certain that Canada has been advised that the White House has made up its mind on 9/16-inch-thick hulls, full head shields, thermal insulation, and enhanced rollover protection for top fittings. This was the option preferred by the Association of American Railroads, which naturally welcomed the Canadian decision as the benchmark for a necessarily common North American standard.

However, Canada’s May 2017 deadline for getting DOT-111s out of crude oil service effectively scuttles the U.S. regulators’ strategy of shuffling the oldest cars to Alberta tar sands service as new cars come on stream.

The rule package proposed by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) anticipates DOT-111s remaining in crude oil service until October 2020: “. . . some DOT(-111) Unjacketed and CPC 1232 Unjacketed cars (about 8,000 cars) will be transferred to Alberta, Canada tar sands services. No existing tank cars will be forced into early retirement.”

The two recent Ontario explosions of CN unit trains hauling Alberta tar sands crude had already exposed PHMSA’s incomprehensible misunderstanding of bitumen blended for transport. (“Dilbit” is bitumen diluted with naptha or other liquid petroleum gases to make it flow; “synbit” is partially refined bitumen intentionally boosted with highly explosive hydrogen gas.)

 

 

Link to Globe and Mail article of subject

Safe Rail Communities west Toronto local petition to the city of Toronto


…info from the group about the effort below

Safe Rail Communities (SRC) is a community-based initiative, advocating for greater transparency and safeguards with respect to the transportation of hazardous materials along rail lines throughout Canada. Come out to learn more and sign our federal petition at the Community Environment Day on June 1st from 10am – 2pm. Located in the city parking lot at Lakeshore Blvd and Ellis Ave (just east of Ellis Ave).
For more information visit:
www.saferail.ca (still in the works)
www.facebook.com/saferail
twitter@safe_rail
infosaferail@gmail.com.

 
There on-line petition to the city of Toronto is also up and running;

click here to view

 

in other news about the subject of safe rail, here is a

link to a recent Toronto Star Article