The Blog

Why a dialect of Arabic was the Junctions second language in the 70’s though the 90’s

 

 

Photos and transcription by contributor Wayne Adam – 2015, http://torontoplaques.com/Pages/Maltese_Community.html

Maltese was a most common language spoken in the Junction, by residents and shop keepers, for decades.

 

The Maltese language is an Arabic dialects, it sounds like Arabic with a sprinkling of English phrases.

The main linguistic transformation came in around 1050, when the ruling Arabs absorbed the existing community and, through force of numbers, replaced the local tongue with their own. The Sicilians and the Knights of Malta followed. Sicilian, Latin and Italian, which was later declared the country’s official language, enjoyed high status for centuries – but Arabic persisted.

Professor Joseph Brincat, who teaches linguistics at the University of Malta, says it is too early to say whether Maltese will survive as a,

 

Eurobarometer poll in 2012, some 90% of the island’s population speak English. Another 36% speak Italian. Half of the subjects in the country’s schools and almost all of its university courses are taught in English. Shop signs and menus are in English and Italian; newspapers in English and Maltese.

After the read more link, Photos and transcription by contributor Wayne Adam – Posted June, 2015

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Why a dialect of Arabic was the Junctions second language in the 70’s though the 90’s

 

 

Photos and transcription by contributor Wayne Adam – 2015, http://torontoplaques.com/Pages/Maltese_Community.html

Maltese was a most common language spoken in the Junction, by residents and shop keepers, for decades.

 

The Maltese language is an Arabic dialects, it sounds like Arabic with a sprinkling of English phrases.

The main linguistic transformation came in around 1050, when the ruling Arabs absorbed the existing community and, through force of numbers, replaced the local tongue with their own. The Sicilians and the Knights of Malta followed. Sicilian, Latin and Italian, which was later declared the country’s official language, enjoyed high status for centuries – but Arabic persisted.

Professor Joseph Brincat, who teaches linguistics at the University of Malta, says it is too early to say whether Maltese will survive as a,

 

Eurobarometer poll in 2012, some 90% of the island’s population speak English. Another 36% speak Italian. Half of the subjects in the country’s schools and almost all of its university courses are taught in English. Shop signs and menus are in English and Italian; newspapers in English and Maltese.

After the read more link, Photos and transcription by contributor Wayne Adam – Posted June, 2015

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Howard Hodgkin’s last major painting, unbelievable

click image for full size

 

Sir Howard Hodgkin’s last major painting – a large and “extraordinary” self-portrait – is going on display for the first time at the National Portrait Gallery. The celebrated British painter died earlier this month at the age of 84, as the gallery was preparing for the first exhibition of his portraits. He painted Portrait Of The Artist Listening To Music, completing the “deeply personal” work just before his death, for the new exhibition. Curators said the oil-on-wood painting memorialises the “act of remembering” in paint.

Sir Howard, who was renowned for his abstract works and for painting from memory rather than direct observation, worked on the image while listening to recordings of two pieces of his favourite music continuously, associated with earlier times in his life. They were Jerome Kern’s The Last Time I Saw Paris, published in 1940, and the zither music from the 1949 film The Third Man, composed and performed by Anton Karas. Opening on Thursday, Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends is the first exhibition devoted to the portraits of the great British painter.

News

Junction Night Market from 7:00 – 11:00 pm on July 22, 2017,

 

Junction Farmers Market to hold night market again in support of our community voucher program. They have partnered with the Four Villages Community Health Centre to create and execute our voucher program, which assists low income peoplein our community gain access to fresh and healthy food by redeeming vouchers distributed by Four Villages at our farmers’ market.
The program requires funding to sustain itself.

Junction Night Market from 7:00 – 11:00 pm on July 22, 2017, the proceeds of which will go directly to the voucher program.

35, 41-63, 65 and 95 High Park Avenue and 66 and 102-116 Pacific Avenue public meeting about townhouse demolishing for construction of apartment buildings.

 

Being considered, Etobicoke York Community Council consideration on April 4, 2017.

Basic facts,

These applications propose to demolish two existing blocks of rental townhouses containing 20 units and also to eliminate four existing 2 bedroom rental apartment units (3 units in 66 Pacific Avenue and 1 in 65 High Park Avenue), to facilitate the development of four new apartment buildings containing a total of 1,031 new rental dwelling units, and having building heights of 39, 34, 29 and 8 stories, on the lands municipally known as 35, 41-63, 65 and 95 High Park Avenue and 66 and 102-116 Pacific Avenue.

full city file after read more link

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Dusk Dances – Toronto-based nonprofit that makes high-quality dance accessible to the communititesy


Italic text from the groups site
What is Dusk Dances?

Dusk Dances is an outdoor dance festival that brings high quality contemporary and traditional dance to public parks. As dusk descends, a theatrical host leads the audience – which invariably includes children, dog walkers and local residents – to eclectic dance pieces that unfold in different areas of the park.

Choreographers from various backgrounds are invited to perform a ten-minute piece inspired by the park’s natural environment. Audiences are invited on a pay-what-you-can basis to an innovative site-specific festival, which is not only an artistic event but a social and cultural one as well. 2016 will be Dusk Dances’ 22nd season.

Stepping up for dance: despite a tight deadline and an even tighter budget, a Toronto firm helps put a local dance company on solid footing
Communication World. 28.4 (July-August 2011): p40.
Full Text:

Dusk Dances is a Toronto-based nonprofit that makes high-quality dance accessible to the community by staging performances in public parks. Critically acclaimed for its array of traditional and contemporary styles, Dusk Dances works with choreographers, community agencies and youth groups to nurture and promote local talent, including dancers from low-income and ethnic minority communities.

Despite its stellar reputation, Dusk Dances has performed in grassroots obscurity for much of its 16-year history. Until recently, this had not hampered its progress. By focusing promotional efforts on the neighborhoods around the three to five parks where it typically held performances each year, Dusk Dances was able to draw local audiences and fulfill its social mandate. However, in 2009, its two leading funders, the Ontario and Toronto Arts Councils, told the group that it must diversify its sources of funding. To continue to thrive, Dusk Dances needed to increase its private sector revenue.

To build recognition of Dusk Dances as more than just a neighborhood show, d’na created a complete summer festival program that showcased all seven events. This was the first time that Dusk Dances had marketed its performances together in one brochure. Not only did this communicate the breadth of the growing festival, but it also cross-promoted the shows in each community. In addition, d’na introduced brand consistency across all materials. In the past, each brochure had its own cover photograph and look. While preserving local content, d’na crafted materials with the same dynamic cover image, the same call to action (“Take the Plunge”) and the same newly designed Dusk Dances header. The Dusk Dances brand was no longer fragmented: Whether a festival performance took place in an urban area or a rural one, in a well-to-do neighborhood or a poor one, the new brand identity united them as part of Dusk Dances’ inclusive vision.

For Dusk Dances’ business goals to be achieved, d’na felt it was essential to elevate the group brand status without losing its local flexibility and grassroots charm. Though it was outside the scope of the project, d’na modified the organization’s existing logo to give it more impact. Copy blocks were written for all materials promoting the group’s status as a nonprofit and inviting public support. In low-income communities where Dusk Dances ran community development programs, brochures featuring neighborhood dancers doubled as cost-effective promotional posters. In the two new licensing sites, branded templates for posters, postcards and print ads made room for local content and sponsor recognition. In Withrow Park, newly branded posters and hand-delivered postcards targeted this more affluent community, resulting in media attention and audience numbers that exceeded Dusk Dances’ highest expectations.

Measurement and evaluation

The rejuvenated brand and 2010 festival materials were all completed within the two-month time frame. To meet budgetary constraints, d’na made 70 percent of its fee pro bono, and designed volunteer T-shirts, a fundraising e-blast and the updated logo free of charge. Working with a print broker, d’na also reduced Dusk Dances’ printing costs by 30 percent. This allowed the branding to have a much bigger impact in its first year rollout, delivering the following results:

* Unprecedented print, radio, television and electronic media coverage, including previews and reviews in the Toronto Star, Toronto Life and the Vancouver Sun and on CBC Radio, RadioCanada and–for the first time in years–Global News and CTV News. The only difference in outreach between 2010 and previous years was the new materials.

* Record turnout at the Withrow Park festival. Audience numbers rose by almost 60 percent over 2009 levels to 3,850 people, while on-site contributions increased by 56 percent to CDN$11,314–both well above the 20 percent goal. Dusk Dances also experienced a 25 percent growth in attendance at its Vancouver performance.

* Highly successful launch of the two licensing sites: Dusk Dances Haliburton attracted 1,590 people and CDN$5,161 in on-site donations. Dusk Dances Flesherton drew 740 people and CDN$2,604–in a town of only 700 people! Both licensees have renewed for 2011, and two new sites (Ottawa, and Fredericton, New Brunswick) have come on board.

* A direct mailer and e-blast designed by d’na helped Dusk Dances achieve its holiday fundraising goal of CDN$4,500, double the direct-response contributions of 2009.

Maria Papadakis is managing partner of d’na (dakis & associates), a design and advertising consultancy in Toronto, {deletethisline}

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Interested in doing the Junction a public favour?

You may not want to be a driver of a local public initiative, but want input and you may want a quick knowledge base to help you. Reading or even skimming the Gehl Institute Pubs, is a good and fun, and excitement inducing activity.

click the above image orhere to go to their download page.

a bit about the publisher from archdaily.com

The Knight Foundation has announced the launch of the nonprofit Gehl Institute, led by Gehl Architects’ Jeff Risom. With the Foundation’s financial support, the Institute strives to boost urban livability by increasing public engagement and economic opportunity through the reformation of public space. A series of studies will investigate the behavioral effects of streets, parks, and plazas on their occupants. The results, coupled with community involvement in the planning process, will be applied toward developing “people-first” public spaces that respond to their unique contexts. Through this approach, the Gehl Institute hopes to foster a new design field that addresses the widening social and economic concerns that accompany urbanization. For more information, visit gehlinstitute.org.

Earth Hour Saturday March 25,7:45 pm to 9:00 pmLambton House, 4066 Old Dundas St. York

Earth Hour Saturday March 25, 2017

Date:
Sat, 25 Mar,
7:45 pm to 9:00 pm
Lambton House, 4066 Old Dundas St. York M6S 2R6

Join Green 13 and Heritage York for the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour.

Where: Meet at Lambton House, 4066 Old Dundas Street, York Ontario M6S 2R6

When: Saturday March 25, 2017

Start Time: 7:45 PM – gather on the front lawn

Walk Time: 8-9 PM

Speakers: 9 PM inside.

Refreshments and entertainment to follow

The walk along the Humber River will be lead by Madeleine McDowell.

Please bring your own lantern or flashlight. If you do not have a lantern a candle in a mason jar will work. We will have some tea lights for those who need a candle, but please bring a glass jar to put the candle in.

See you there!

Green 13

Etienne-Louis 1784 Cenotaphe a Newton interior

File:Boullee Etienne-Louis 1784 Cenotaphe a Newton interior.jpg